+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates



Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates



Bmc Microbiology 11: 247



Candida can cause mucocutaneous and/or systemic infections in hospitalized and immunosuppressed patients. Most individuals are colonized by Candida spp. as part of the oral flora and the intestinal tract. We compared oral and systemic isolates for the capacity to form biofilm in an in vitro biofilm model and pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The oral Candida strains were isolated from the HIV patients and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. dubliniensis. The systemic strains were isolated from patients with invasive candidiasis and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr. For each of the acquired strains, biofilm formation was evaluated on standardized samples of silicone pads and acrylic resin. We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival. The biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Galleria was similar between oral and systemic isolates. The quantity of biofilm formed and the virulence in G. mellonella were different for each of the species studied. On silicone pads, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis produced more biofilm (1.12 to 6.61 mg) than the other species (0.25 to 3.66 mg). However, all Candida species produced a similar biofilm on acrylic resin, material used in dental prostheses. C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis were the most virulent species in G. mellonella with 100% of mortality, followed by C. lusitaniae (87%), C. novergensis (37%), C. krusei (25%), C. glabrata (20%), and C. kefyr (12%). We found that on silicone pads as well as in the Galleria model, biofilm formation and virulence depends on the Candida species. Importantly, for C. albicans the pathogenicity of oral Candida isolates was similar to systemic Candida isolates, suggesting that Candida isolates have similar biofilm-forming ability and virulence regardless of the infection site from which it was isolated.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 054779353

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 22053894

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2180-11-247


Related references

Examination of the genetic variability among biofilm-forming Candida albicans clinical isolates FT Estudio de la variabilidad genetica entire aislamientosentos clinicos de Candida albicans formadores de biopeliculas. 2007

Variation in biofilm formation among blood and oral isolates of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis. Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiologia Clinica 29(9): 660-665, 2011

Distribution of clinical isolates of Candida spp. and antifungal susceptibility of high biofilm-forming Candida isolates. Revista Da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical 51(5): 644-650, 2018

Biofilm production in oral Candida isolates from HIV-positive individuals from Pune, India. Mycoses 56(2): 182-186, 2013

Experimental systemic virulence of oral Candida dubliniensis isolates in comparison with Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Mycoses 54(5): E278, 2011

Sub-inhibitory concentrations of antifungals suppress hemolysin activity of oral Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis isolates from HIV-infected individuals. Mycopathologia 178(3-4): 207-215, 2014

Increased expression of virulence attributes in oral Candida albicans isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive individuals. Journal of Medical Microbiology 61(Pt 2): 285-290, 2012

Retrospective identification and characterization of Candida dubliniensis isolates among Candida albicans clinical laboratory isolates from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 38(6): 2423-2426, 2000

Biofilm-forming ability and adherence to poly-(methyl-methacrylate) acrylic resin materials of oral Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects. Journal of Advanced Prosthodontics 6(1): 30-34, 2014

In-vitro proteinase production by oral Candida albicans isolates from individuals with and without HIV infection and its attenuation by antimycotic agents. Journal of Medical Microbiology 44(4): 311-316, 1996

Examination of the genetic variability among biofilm-forming Candida albicans clinical isolates. Revista Iberoamericana de Micologia 24(4): 268-271, 2007

Candida albicans and non-C. albicans Candida species: comparison of biofilm production and metabolic activity in biofilms, and putative virulence properties of isolates from hospital environments and infections. Mycopathologia 175(3-4): 265-272, 2013

Comparative study of adherence of oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV sero-positive individuals and HIV sero-negative individuals to human buccal epithelial cells. Indian Journal of Pathology and Microbiology 53(3): 513-517, 2010

Biofilm production in bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida species. Abstracts of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 37: 323, 1997

In vitro susceptibilities of invasive isolates of Candida species: rapid increase in rates of fluconazole susceptible-dose dependent Candida glabrata isolates. Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 52(8): 2919-2922, 2008