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Physiological effects of using the low intensity strength training without relaxation in single-joint and multi-joint movements



Physiological effects of using the low intensity strength training without relaxation in single-joint and multi-joint movements



Rossiiskii Fiziologicheskii Zhurnal Imeni I.M. Sechenova 93(1): 27-38



The effects of classical strength training (CT) and low intensity strength training without relaxation (TwR) upon size, strength and fatigability of leg muscles in men were compared. A 8-10-week strength training led to an increase of size and maximal voluntary contraction of trained muscles. After the CT, the increment of strength was higher; on the other hand, strength increments related to total work performed increased after the TwR noticeably higher than after the CT. Two training programs influenced the size of total muscle and of muscle fibers (MF) differently: the volume of m. quadriceps femoris increased more after the CT than after the TwR. The CT induced a significant increase of cross sectional area (CSA) of fast MF, and the TwR induced an increase of CSA of slow MF. Resistance to fatigue after the TwR was higher than after the. The effects of TwR were more pronounced in single-joint movements training than in multi-joint movement.

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Accession: 055001792

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PMID: 17465271


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