EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Preferences, experience, and attitudes in the management of chronic pain and depression: a comparison of physicians and medical students






Clinical Journal of Pain 30(9): 766-774

Preferences, experience, and attitudes in the management of chronic pain and depression: a comparison of physicians and medical students

The current study investigated clinicians' treatment preferences for chronic pain and depression and the extent to which these preferences were related to clinicians' experience and attitudes. Eighty-five participants (50 physicians, 35 medical students) made treatment recommendations for 8 virtual patients with chronic low back pain and depression. The 10 treatment options included pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches. Participants also provided information about their clinical experience and completed measures assessing their attitudes toward patients with pain and depression. The highest recommended treatments were over-the-counter medications and topical modalities, whereas "no intervention," referral to a pain specialist, and opioid medication received the lowest ratings. Physicians gave higher ratings to physical therapy (P<0.05) and lifestyle activities (P<0.05) than did medical students. Students reported more negative attitudes about patients with depression (P<0.05) than did physicians. After controlling for participants' attitudes, the treatment preferenceƗtraining level interaction was no longer significant (P>0.05). Physicians and medical students shared a general preference for "low-risk," self-management approaches for chronic pain and depression; however, they differed in their recommendations for some specific treatments. Participants' attitudes toward patients with pain and depression were associated with their preferences and accounted for the differences in their treatment decisions. These results suggest a need for early and continuing education to reduce clinicians' negative attitudes toward and improve the management of patients with chronic pain and depression.


Accession: 055116688

PMID: 24064934

DOI: 10.1097/AJP.0000000000000035



Related references

Nimmaanrat, S.; Oofuvong, M., 2016: Attitudes of Medical Students Regarding Cancer Pain Management: Comparison Between Pre- and Post-Lecture Test Findings. Medical practitioners' attitudes have a significant impact on quality of care for cancer pain patients. This study was conducted to determine if being given a lecture concerning cancer pain and its management could improve the attitudes of me...

Hollingshead, N.A.; Meints, S.; Middleton, S.K.; Free, C.A.; Hirsh, A.T., 2016: Examining influential factors in providers' chronic pain treatment decisions: a comparison of physicians and medical students. Chronic pain treatment guidelines are unclear and conflicting, which contributes to inconsistent pain care. In order to improve pain care, it is important to understand the various factors that providers rely on to make treatment decisions. The pu...

Smith, L.D.; Peck, P.L.; McGovern, R.J., 2003: Comparison of medical students, medical school faculty, primary care physicians, and the general population on attitudes toward psychological help-seeking. This study is a preliminary comparison of the attitudes of osteopathic medical students, medical school faculty, primary care providers, and the general population toward seeking professional psychological help. Attitudes were also studied in the...

Ali, N.; Thomson, D., 2008: A comparison of the knowledge of chronic pain and its management between final year physiotherapy and medical students. The scientific literature reveals a surprising lack of knowledge of chronic pain mechanisms and its management amongst health care professionals, including physicians and physiotherapists. There is little information directly related to a comparis...

Lasch, K.; Greenhill, A.; Wilkes, G.; Carr, D.; Lee, M.; Blanchard, R., 2002: Why study pain? A qualitative analysis of medical and nursing faculty and students' knowledge of and attitudes to cancer pain management. Although effective means for pain management have long been available, cancer pain remains widely undertreated. Surveys of medical personnel have revealed knowledge deficits and attitudinal barriers to pain management, but have not determined why...

Ger, L-Ping.; Lee, M-Chien.; Wong, C-Shung.; Chao, S-Shin.; Wang, J-Joung.; Ho, S-Tai., 2003: The effect of education and clinical practice on knowledge enlightenment to and attitudes toward the use of analgesics for cancer pain among physicians and medical students. Insufficient education and limited clinical practice on the part of physicians may contribute to the undertreatment of cancer pain in Taiwan. To address these concerns, a survey among physicians and fifth-year medical students relevant to cancer p...

Tzeitlin, T.; Shvartzman, P., 2000: Knowledge, attitudes and skills of family physicians with regarding to chronic pain management in cancer. Prolonged suffering from pain can affect quality of life to the point where patients lose desire to live. The attitude towards pain management in cancer patients has changed over the last two decades. The principles of treatment are based on presc...

Ger, L.P.; Ho, S.T.; Wang, J.J., 2000: Physicians' knowledge and attitudes toward the use of analgesics for cancer pain management: a survey of two medical centers in Taiwan. The purposes of this study were to examine the attitudes of physicians regarding the optimal use of analgesics for cancer pain management (CPM), to evaluate their knowledge and attitudes toward opioid prescribing, and to comprehend their perceptio...

Ung, A.; Salamonson, Y.; Hu, W.; Gallego, G., 2016: Assessing knowledge, perceptions and attitudes to pain management among medical and nursing students: a review of the literature. Chronic pain results in significant personal, societal and economic burden. Doctors and nurses have a pivotal role in patient pain management. In order to determine the effectiveness of current pain education on knowledge, attitudes and perception...

Tzeitlin, T.; Shvartzman, P., 2000: Knowledge, attitudes and skills of family physicians in Israel with regard to chronic pain management in cancer. Prolonged suffering from pain can affect quality of life to the point where patients lose desire to live. The attitude towards pain management in cancer patients has changed over the last two decades. The principles of treatment are based on presc...