+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement and publication bias



Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement and publication bias



Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 39(2): 91-92



Publication bias is a major problem in evidence based medicine. As well as positive outcome studies being preferentially published or followed by full text publication authors are also more likely to publish positive results in English-language journals. This unequal distribution of trials leads to a selection bias in evidence l level studies, like systematic reviews, meta-analysis or health technology assessments followed by a systematic failure of interpretation and in clinical decisions. Publication bias in a systematic review occurs mostly during the selection process and a transparent selection process is necessary to avoid such bias. For systematic reviews/meta-analysis the PRISMA-statement (formerly known as QUOROM) is recommended, as it gives the reader for a better understanding of the selection process. In the future the use of trial registration for minimizing publication bias, mechanisms to allow easier access to the scientific literature and improvement in the peer review process are recommended to overcome publication bias. The use of checklists like PRISMA is likely to improve the reporting quality of a systematic review and provides substantial transparency in the selection process of papers in a systematic review.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 055117179

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 21145753

DOI: 10.1016/j.jcms.2010.11.001


Related references

Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement. Plos Medicine 6(7): E1000097-E1000097, 2009

Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement. International Journal of Surgery 8(5): 336-341, 2010

Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 62(10): 1006-1012, 2009

Reprint--preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses: the PRISMA statement. Physical Therapy 89(9): 873-880, 2009

Evaluation of the endorsement of the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement on the quality of published systematic review and meta-analyses. Plos One 8(12): E83138-E83138, 2014

Evaluations of the uptake and impact of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement and extensions: a scoping review. Systematic Reviews 6(1): 263-263, 2018

Quality of reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses: PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses). Rofo 183(12): 1106-1110, 2012

Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of individual participant data: the PRISMA-IPD Statement. JAMA 313(16): 1657-1665, 2015

Compliance of systematic reviews in veterinary journals with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) literature search reporting guidelines. Journal of the Medical Library Association 105(3): 233-239, 2018

Jurors' and Judges' Evaluation of Defendants with Autism and the Impact on Sentencing: A Systematic Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) Review of Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Courtroom. Journal of Law and Medicine 25(1): 105-123, 2018

Association of study quality with completeness of reporting: have completeness of reporting and quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in major radiology journals changed since publication of the PRISMA statement?. Radiology 269(2): 413-426, 2014

Preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement. Systematic Reviews 4: 1-1, 2015

Preferred Reporting Items for a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies: The PRISMA-DTA Statement. JAMA 319(4): 388-396, 2018

The EQUATOR Network and the PRISMA Statement for the reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PhysioTherapy 95(4): 237-240, 2010

Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Oncology Nursing Forum 42(5): 552-554, 2016