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Preoperative education for hip or knee replacement



Preoperative education for hip or knee replacement



Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2015(5): Cd003526



Hip or knee replacement is a major surgical procedure that can be physically and psychologically stressful for patients. It is hypothesised that education before surgery reduces anxiety and enhances clinically important postoperative outcomes. To determine whether preoperative education in people undergoing total hip replacement or total knee replacement improves postoperative outcomes with respect to pain, function, health-related quality of life, anxiety, length of hospital stay and the incidence of adverse events (e.g. deep vein thrombosis). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2013, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2013), EMBASE (1980 to May 2013), CINAHL (1982 to May 2013), PsycINFO (1872 to May 2013) and PEDro to July 2010. We handsearched the Australian Journal of Physiotherapy (1954 to 2009) and reviewed the reference lists of included trials and other relevant reviews. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of preoperative education (verbal, written or audiovisual) delivered by a health professional within six weeks of surgery to people undergoing hip or knee replacement compared with usual care. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We analysed dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios. We combined continuous outcomes using mean differences (MD) or standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Where possible, we pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. We included 18 trials (1463 participants) in the review. Thirteen trials involved people undergoing hip replacement, three involved people undergoing knee replacement and two included both people with hip and knee replacements. Only six trials reported using an adequate method of allocation concealment, and only two trials blinded participants. Few trials reported sufficient data to analyse the major outcomes of the review (pain, function, health-related quality of life, global assessment, postoperative anxiety, total adverse events and re-operation rate). There did not appear to be an effect of time on any outcome, so we chose to include only the latest time point available per outcome in the review.In people undergoing hip replacement, preoperative education may not offer additional benefits over usual care. The mean postoperative anxiety score at six weeks with usual care was 32.16 on a 60-point scale (lower score represents less anxiety) and was 2.28 points lower with preoperative education (95% confidence interval (CI) -5.68 to 1.12; 3 RCTs, 264 participants, low-quality evidence), an absolute risk difference of -4% (95% CI -10% to 2%). The mean pain score up to three months postoperatively with usual care was 3.1 on a 10-point scale (lower score represents less pain) and was 0.34 points lower with preoperative education (95% CI -0.94 to 0.26; 3 RCTs, 227 participants; low-quality evidence), an absolute risk difference of -3% (95% CI -9% to 3%). The mean function score at 3 to 24 months postoperatively with usual care was 18.4 on a 68-point scale (lower score represents better function) and was 4.84 points lower with preoperative education (95% CI -10.23 to 0.66; 4 RCTs, 177 participants; low-quality evidence), an absolute risk difference of -7% (95% CI -15% to 1%). The number of people reporting adverse events, such as infection and deep vein thrombosis, did not differ between groups, but the effect estimates are uncertain due to very low quality evidence (23% (17/75) reported events with usual care versus 18% (14/75) with preoperative education; risk ratio (RR) 0.79; 95% CI 0.19 to 3.21; 2 RCTs, 150 participants). Health-related quality of life, global assessment of treatment success and re-operation rates were not reported.In people undergoing knee replacement, preoperative education may not offer additional benefits over usual care. The mean pain score at 12 months postoperatively with usual care was 80 on a 100-point scale (lower score represents less pain) and was 2 points lower with preoperative education (95% CI -3.45 to 7.45; 1 RCT, 109 participants), an absolute risk difference of -2% (95% CI -4% to 8%). The mean function score at 12 months postoperatively with usual care was 77 on a 100-point scale (lower score represents better function) and was no different with preoperative education (0; 95% CI -5.63 to 5.63; 1 RCT, 109 participants), an absolute risk difference of 0% (95% CI -6% to 6%). The mean health-related quality of life score at 12 months postoperatively with usual care was 41 on a 100-point scale (lower score represents worse quality of life) and was 3 points lower with preoperative education (95% CI -6.38 to 0.38; 1 RCT, 109 participants), an absolute risk difference of -3% (95% CI -6% to 1%). The number of people reporting adverse events, such as infection and deep vein thrombosis, did not differ between groups (18% (11/60) reported events with usual care versus 13% (7/55) with preoperative education; RR 0.69; 95% CI 0.29 to 1.6 6; 1 RCT, 115 participants), an absolute risk difference of -6% (-19% to 8%). Global assessment of treatment success, postoperative anxiety and re-operation rates were not reported. Although preoperative education is embedded in the consent process, we are unsure if it offers benefits over usual care in terms of reducing anxiety, or in surgical outcomes, such as pain, function and adverse events. Preoperative education may represent a useful adjunct, with low risk of undesirable effects, particularly in certain patients, for example people with depression, anxiety or unrealistic expectations, who may respond well to preoperative education that is stratified according to their physical, psychological and social need.

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Accession: 055128825

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PMID: 24820247

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003526.pub3


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