+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Prevalence of and factors that influence board certification among pharmacy practice faculty at United States colleges and schools of pharmacy



Prevalence of and factors that influence board certification among pharmacy practice faculty at United States colleges and schools of pharmacy



PharmacoTherapy 33(1): 105-111



Board certification is a means of demonstrating expertise above the minimum licensing standards. For many health care professionals, this credential is a necessity. As pharmacists become involved in more advanced patient care services, board certification becomes an essential component to ensuring quality care. The prevalence of United States pharmacy practice faculty members who are board certified, however, is unknown. In addition, to our knowledge, factors that serve to motivate or discourage faculty from obtaining board certification have not been previously described; thus, 900 pharmacy practice faculty members listed in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) online directory were invited to complete an online survey regarding motivators and barriers for board certification. In addition, a list of board-certified pharmacists, obtained from the Board of Pharmacy Specialties, was used to check the board certification status of all pharmacy practice faculty members listed in the AACP directory. In 2011, the prevalence of board certification among the 2867 pharmacy practice faculty members was 37% (1063 pharmacists), with the highest prevalence found among assistant professors (39.4%). A total of 322 faculty members (36% response rate) completed the survey; of these, 308 self-identified as pharmacy practice faculty, and their responses were included in the analysis. Current board certification in pharmacy specialties was reported by 163 respondents (52.9%); 14 (4.5%) were previously certified. Among the 308 respondents, the most common perceived reason why pharmacy practice faculty become board certified was the desire to be recognized as an expert in the field (71.5%). Those who were currently board certified indicated personal growth as the most important reason (60.1%). Those previously certified indicated no perceived benefit as the most common reason for not recertifying (71.4%). Among those never certified, no perceived need (52.0%) or benefit (44.8%) were the most common reasons for not becoming certified; however, a majority of those never certified (68%) stated that they would become board certified if there was no associated cost and they were confident they would pass. To increase the prevalence of board certification in pharmacy practice faculty at U.S. schools and colleges of pharmacy, the benefits of this credential must be addressed at each institution. Steps should be taken to assist and encourage board certification.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 055154947

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 23307551

DOI: 10.1002/phar.1171


Related references

Pharmacy faculty retirement at colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Canada. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 76(1): 4, 2012

Accredited schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States holding membership in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 40(5): 511-512, 1976

Board of Pharmaceutical Specialties-certified faculty: a survey of United States colleges of pharmacy. PharmacoTherapy 24(3): 395-400, 2004

Number and impact of published scholarly works by pharmacy practice faculty members at accredited US colleges and schools of pharmacy (2001-2003). American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 71(3): 44, 2007

Assessment of full-time faculty preceptors by colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Puerto Rico. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 76(8): 148, 2013

A blueprint for transitioning pharmacy residents into successful clinical faculty members in colleges and schools of pharmacy. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 77(9): 200, 2014

Utilization of external reviews by colleges of pharmacy during the promotion and tenure process for pharmacy practice faculty. Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning 9(2): 255-260, 2018

Attributes of colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 73(5): 96, 2009

Interprofessional education in introductory pharmacy practice experiences at US colleges and schools of pharmacy. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 76(5): 80, 2012

Impact of advanced pharmacy practice experience placement changes in colleges and schools of pharmacy. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 76(3): 49, 2012

Assessment of Burnout and Associated Risk Factors Among Pharmacy Practice Faculty in the United States. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 81(4): 75, 2017

Pharmacogenomics in the curricula of colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 74(1): 7, 2010

Balance of academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States: a survey of select American College of Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Research Network Members. PharmacoTherapy 34(12): 1239-1249, 2015

On teaching history of pharmacy in the colleges of pharmacy in the United States. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education 11(2): 277-279, 2011

Attracting and retaining faculty at new schools of pharmacy in the United States. Pharmacy Education 5(2): 79-81, 2005