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Psychiatric diagnoses and cognitive impairment in pediatric multiple sclerosis



Psychiatric diagnoses and cognitive impairment in pediatric multiple sclerosis



Multiple Sclerosis 20(5): 588-593



Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) represents approximately 5% of the MS population; information regarding clinical features is slowly accumulating. Cognitive and psychiatric impairments frequently occur, but remain poorly understood. To describe psychiatric diagnoses among children with MS referred for psychiatric assessment and their relation to cognitive impairment. Forty-five pediatric MS patients (aged 8 to 17 years) were referred for outpatient psychiatric evaluation including a psychiatric interview (K-SADS), a clinician-based global assessment of functioning (Children's Global Assessment Scale, CGAS), a neurologic examination including the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and a neuropsychological test battery. The most common categories of psychiatric diagnoses were anxiety disorders (n=15), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, n=12), and mood disorders (n=11). Cognitive impairment was classified in 20/25 (80%) of patients meeting criteria for a psychiatric disorder versus 11/20 (55%) of those without psychiatric disorder (p=0.08). Those diagnosed with anxiety or mood disorder had the highest frequency of cognitive impairment, with a significantly higher rate when compared with those with psychiatric diagnoses in other categories (p=0.05). A variety of psychiatric diagnoses can occur in children with pediatric MS. Many of these children also had cognitive impairment, particularly those in the mood and anxiety groups.

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Accession: 055268287

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 24072721

DOI: 10.1177/1352458513504249


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