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RAGE: exacting a toll on the host in response to polymicrobial sepsis and Listeria monocytogenes



RAGE: exacting a toll on the host in response to polymicrobial sepsis and Listeria monocytogenes



Critical Care 11(6): 183-183



The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) has complex roles in the immune/inflammatory response. RAGE is expressed on monocytes/macrophages, T and B lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. Previous studies illustrated that homozygous RAGE-/- mice subjected to overwhelming bacterial sepsis displayed normal clearance of pathogenic bacteria and significantly increased survival. In this issue of Critical Care, Lutterloh and colleagues confirm these findings and provide evidence that blocking antibodies to RAGE afford similar protection in mice, even when administration of anti-RAGE is delayed by 24 hours. Furthermore, these authors illustrate that deletion of RAGE is remarkably protective in mice infected with the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. In this Commentary, we consider these findings and propose possible mechanisms by which RAGE exacts a heavy toll on the host in response to polymicrobial sepsis and L. monocytogenes.

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Accession: 055333038

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 18190725

DOI: 10.1186/cc6193



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