+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Real-time polymerase chain reaction in transfusion medicine: applications for detection of bacterial contamination in blood products



Real-time polymerase chain reaction in transfusion medicine: applications for detection of bacterial contamination in blood products



Transfusion Medicine Reviews 21(3): 237-254



Bacterial contamination of blood components, particularly of platelet concentrates (PCs), represents the greatest infectious risk in blood transfusion. Although the incidence of platelet bacterial contamination is approximately 1 per 2,000 U, the urgent need for a method for the routine screening of PCs to improve safety for patients had not been considered for a long time. Besides the culturing systems, which will remain the criterion standard, rapid methods for sterility screening will play a more important role in transfusion medicine in the future. In particular, nucleic acid amplification techniques (NATs) are powerful potential tools for bacterial screening assays. The combination of excellent sensitivity and specificity, reduced contamination risk, ease of performance, and speed has made real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology an appealing alternative to conventional culture-based testing methods. When using real-time PCR for the detection of bacterial contamination, several points have to be considered. The main focus is the choice of the target gene; the assay format; the nucleic acid extraction method, depending on the sample type; and the evaluation of an ideal sampling strategy. However, several factors such as the availability of bacterial-derived nucleic acid amplification reagents, the impracticability, and the cost have limited the use of NATs until now. Attempts to reduce the presence of contaminating nucleic acids from reagents in real-time PCR have been described, but none of these approaches have proven to be very effective or to lower the sensitivity of the assay. Recently, a number of broad-range NAT assays targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA or 23S ribosomal RNA for the detection of bacteria based on real-time technology have been reported. This review will give a short survey of current approaches to and the limitations of the application of real-time PCR for bacterial detection in blood components, with emphasis on the bacterial contamination of PCs.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 055392204

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 17572262

DOI: 10.1016/j.tmrv.2007.03.006


Related references

Activity and DNA contamination of commercial polymerase chain reaction reagents for the universal 16S rDNA real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of bacterial pathogens in blood. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease 66(1): 41-49, 2010

An Internal Reference Control Duplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for Detecting Bacterial Contamination in Blood Products. Plos one 10(7): E0134743, 2015

Optimal sampling time after preparation of platelet concentrates for detection of bacterial contamination by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Vox Sanguinis 89(4): 208-214, 2005

Rapid and accurate detection of Arcobacter contamination in commercial chicken products and wastewater samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 7(3): 327-338, 2010

Development of an ethidium monoazideenhanced internally controlled universal 16S rDNA real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates. Yearbook of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine 2013: 392-394, 2013

Development of an ethidium monoazide-enhanced internally controlled universal 16S rDNA real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates. Transfusion 52(7): 1423-1432, 2012

Detection of castor contamination by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 55(2): 545-550, 2007

New Diagnostic Tools for Neonatal Sepsis: The Role of a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Early Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Species in Blood Samples. Journal of ChemoTherapy 19(Sup2): 31-34, 2007

New diagnostic tools for neonatal sepsis: the role of a real-time polymerase chain reaction for the early detection and identification of bacterial and fungal species in blood samples. Journal of ChemoTherapy 19(Suppl. 2): 31-34, 2007

Real-time NAT-based methods for detection of bacterial contamination in blood products / Real-time NAT-basierte Methoden zur Entdeckung bakterieller Kontamination in Blutprodukten. Laboratoriums Medizin 30(6): 412-427, 2006

Detection of peanuts in food products by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Archiv fur Lebensmittelhygiene 56(5): 112-113, 2005

Real-Time RT-PCR for detection of bacterial contamination in blood products. 2007

Evaluation of a commercial real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of environmental contamination with Clostridium difficile. Journal of Hospital Infection 85(1): 76-78, 2013

Detection of breast cancer cell contamination in leukapheresis product by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Bone Marrow Transplantation 27(5): 517-523, 2001

Efficiency of diversion of the first aliquot of blood and prestorage leukoreduction for preventing bacterial contamination in red blood cell concentrates assessed using a rapid polymerase chain reaction-based bacterial detection system. Transfusion Medicine 21(6): 365-370, 2011