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Regions of arterial stenosis and clinical factors determining transcutaneous oxygen tension in patients with peripheral arterial disease



Regions of arterial stenosis and clinical factors determining transcutaneous oxygen tension in patients with peripheral arterial disease



Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis 17(8): 858-869



Despite the clinical usefulness of transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO(2)) to assess the severity of limb ischemia, the factors determining TcPO(2) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have not been fully clarified. We therefore examined the regions of arterial stenosis and clinical factors affecting lower-extremity TcPO(2). Resting TcPO(2) (REST-TcPO(2)) and postexercise TcPO(2) (Ex-TcPO(2)) in the calf region and the dorsalis pedis were measured simultaneously in 66 patients (132 limbs) with clinically suspected PAD, in whom angiography was also performed. The peripheral arteries of the lower extremities were divided into five segments, and the impact of significant stenosis in each segment on ipsilateral TcPO(2) was evaluated by multiple regression analysis. In the calf region, significant stenosis of the proximal arteries (common-external iliac artery) revealed stronger involvement determining Ex-TcPO(2) than the peripheral segment (posterior tibial artery). In the dorsalis pedis, the peripheral segment (anterior tibial artery) more strongly determined Ex-TcPO(2) and REST-TcPO(2) than proximal segments. Age, creatinine, and diabetes were associated with REST-TcPO(2) of the calf region independent of arterial stenoses, while those of the dorsalis pedis were independently associated with age, and creatinine. In contrast, Ex-TcPO(2) in both regions was not independently associated with clinical factors, except for stenosis of the perfusing arteries. The vascular lesions affecting TcPO(2) differ between the calf region (proximal > peripheral) and the dorsalis pedis (proximal < peripheral). In addition postexercise TcPO(2) is solely determined by stenosis of the perfusing arteries, while TcPO(2) at rest is affected by multiple clinical factors.

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Accession: 055445428

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PMID: 20351469



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