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Relationship of joint hypermobility and musculoskeletal problems and frequency of benign joint hypermobility syndrome in children



Relationship of joint hypermobility and musculoskeletal problems and frequency of benign joint hypermobility syndrome in children



Journal of Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad 22(4): 150-154



The majority of individuals with joint hypermobility remain asymptomatic. However, those associated with Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (BJHS), develop a number of systemic manifestations. Our objective was to determine the relationship between joint hypermobility and musculoskeletal problems, and frequency of BJHS in children and adolescents. This cross-sectional observational descriptive study was conducted at Outpatient Department, The Children's Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan. A total of 872 individuals (4-18 year) were examined for hypermobile joints using Beighton score > or = 4. A questionnaire was implied to get data regarding demographic profile, musculoskeletal and extra-articular complaints, family history of joint problems and daily activity. Brighton's criteria were implied for diagnosis of BJHS. The frequency of joint hypermobility was 37.0%; male 39.5%, and female 34.2% (p = 0.1). There was a gradual decline in mean Beighton score with age. The female population showed increase in mean Beighton score around 16-17 year age. Arthralgias and back pains 7.7% vs. 1.6%, (p < 0.001), and hernias 2.5% (p = 0.03) were significantly higher in individuals with joint hypermobility. History of joint problems in the family was also significantly higher in children with joint hypermobility (p = 0.01). BJHS was detected in 4.8% children (male 3.6% and female 6.3%, p = 0.06). Arthralgias (51.0%), hernias (16.3%), joint dislocations (8.2%) and varicose veins (8.2%) were the most common presentations. BJHS is common among children. Arthralgias, back pains and hernias are significantly higher in these individuals.

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Accession: 055470786

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PMID: 22455285


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