+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Self-estimated physical functioning poorly predicts actual exercise capacity in adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease



Self-estimated physical functioning poorly predicts actual exercise capacity in adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease



European Heart Journal 30(4): 497-504



The aim of this study is to compare self-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) with the objective of exercise performance in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) according to diagnosis. 564 patients (255 females, 14-73 years) with various CHD (62 shunt, 66 left heart obstruction, 33 PS/PR, 47 Ebstein, 96 Fallot, 98 TGA after atrial switch, 38 other TGA, 31 Fontan, 32 palliated/native cyanotic, 61 others) and a group of 53 healthy controls (18 females, 14-57 years) completed a QoL questionnaire (SF-36) and performed a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test. Despite several limitations at exercise (P = 1.30 x 10(-33)), patients only reported reductions in HRQoL concerning physical functioning (P = 4.41 x 10(-15)) and general health (P = 6.17 x 10(-5)) and not psychosocial aspects. This could be confirmed in all diagnostic subgroups. Correlation to peak oxygen uptake was found in physical functioning (r = 0.435, P = 1.72 x 10(-27)) and general health (r = 0.275, P = 3.79 x 10(-11)). However, there was severe overestimation of physical functioning in most patients when compared with actual exercise test results. Patients with CHD rate their HRQoL impaired only in physical functioning and general health and not in any psychosocial aspect. Self-estimated physical functioning poorly predicts actual exercise capacity.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 055702812

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19066211

DOI: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehn531


Related references

Associations between exercise capacity, physical activity, and psychosocial functioning in children with congenital heart disease: a systematic review. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology 21(10): 1200-1215, 2014

Physical activity is associated with improved aerobic exercise capacity over time in adults with congenital heart disease. International Journal of Cardiology 168(5): 4685-4691, 2013

Daily physical activity in adults with congenital heart disease is positively correlated with exercise capacity but not with quality of life. Clinical Research in Cardiology 101(1): 55-61, 2012

Heart rate response during exercise predicts survival in adults with congenital heart disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 48(6): 1250-1256, 2006

Overweight predicts poorer exercise capacity in congenital heart disease patients. International Journal of Cardiology. Heart and Vasculature 9: 28-31, 2015

Emotional functioning of adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease: a meta-analysis. Congenital Heart Disease 10(1): 2, 2015

Physical activity in adolescents and adults with congenital heart defects: individualized exercise prescription. European Heart Journal 34(47): 3669-3674, 2013

Evaluation of exercise capacity with cardiopulmonary exercise test and B-type natriuretic peptide in adults with congenital heart disease. Cardiology Journal 16(2): 133-141, 2009

Exercise capacity in children and adolescents with corrected congenital heart disease. Pediatric Cardiology 36(5): 1075-1082, 2015

Measures of exercise capacity in adults with congenital heart disease. International Journal of Cardiology 153(1): 26-30, 2011

Number of thoracotomies predicts impairment in lung function and exercise capacity in patients with congenital heart disease. Journal of Cardiology 71(1): 88-92, 2018

Adolescents and Young Adults Living with Congenital Heart Disease: Coping, Stress Reactivity, and Emotional Functioning. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings 25(4): 441-451, 2018

The effect of atrial flutter upon exercise capacity in adolescents following congenital heart disease surgery. Pediatric Cardiology: 261, 1984

Intrauterine growth restriction is not associated with decreased exercise capacity in adolescents with congenital heart disease. Congenital Heart Disease 13(3): 369-376, 2018

Abnormal ventilatory response to exercise in adults with congenital heart disease relates to cyanosis and predicts survival. Circulation 113(24): 2796-2802, 2006