Serum glycated albumin, but not glycated haemoglobin, is low in relation to glycemia in hyperuricemic men

Koga, M.; Murai, J.; Saito, H.; Mukai, M.; Kasayama, S.

Acta Diabetologica 47(2): 173-177

2010


ISSN/ISBN: 1432-5233
PMID: 19924375
DOI: 10.1007/s00592-009-0168-6
Accession: 055731123

Download citation:  
Text
  |  
BibTeX
  |  
RIS

Article/Abstract emailed within 0-6 h
Payments are secure & encrypted
Powered by Stripe
Powered by PayPal

Abstract
Measurements of glycated albumin (GA) as well as glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1C)) have been applied in order to monitor chronic glycemic control in diabetic patients. Since the levels of both glycated proteins are influenced by various factors other than glycemia, cautions are necessary to evaluate such measures in some specific conditions. In this study, we examined the effects of serum uric acid (UA) levels on these glycemic markers. One hundred and ninety-three men with normal glucose tolerance were enrolled in this study. Association of serum UA with BMI, plasma glucose (PG), high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP), serum GA and HbA(1C) was analysed. Serum UA showed a significant positive correlation with BMI (R = 0.329, P < 0.0001) and hs-CRP (R = 0.306, P < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed serum UA to be a significant positive explanatory variable for hs-CRP. There was a significant positive correlation of serum UA with the 2-h PG after 75 g OGTT but not fasting PG. Although there was no correlation of serum UA with HbA(1C), serum UA showed a significant inverse correlation with both serum GA (R = -0.402, P < 0.0001) as well as BMI-adjusted serum GA (R = -0.327, P < 0.0001). By multivariate analysis, serum UA was an explanatory variable for serum GA. Serum GA, but not HbA(1C), is set lower in relation to plasma glucose levels in hyperglycemic men. This may be caused by microinflammation associated with hyperuricemic state.

Serum glycated albumin, but not glycated haemoglobin, is low in relation to glycemia in hyperuricemic men