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The illusory perception of movement caused by angular acceleration and by centrifugal force during flight; visually perceived motion and displacement of a fixed target during turns


Journal of Experimental Psychology 38(3): 298-309
The illusory perception of movement caused by angular acceleration and by centrifugal force during flight; visually perceived motion and displacement of a fixed target during turns

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Accession: 056362073

PMID: 18865233



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