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The modified glasgow prognostic score is an independent prognostic factor in patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy



The modified glasgow prognostic score is an independent prognostic factor in patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy



Journal of Cancer 5(8): 689-695



There is increasing evidence that the presence of an inflammation-based prognostic score (modified Glasgow prognostic score, mGPS) is associated with survival in patients with advanced cancer. This study aimed to assess whether the mGPS has prognostic value in patients with thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy. A total of 212 patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for newly-diagnosed esophageal squamous cell carcinoma between October, 2006 and December, 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin were measured before initiation of treatment. The relationships between the mGPS and other relevant variables including white blood cell count, neutrophilic granulocyte count, platelet count, hemoglobin, bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated. Significant prognostic factors were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Three-year OS for all patients was 24.6%; 3-year PFS was 21.3%. Patients with a mGPS of 0, 1 and 2 were 90, 78, 44, respectively. Higher mGPS was related to higher white blood cell, neutrophilic granulocyte and platelet counts, and lower total bilirubin. T stage, M stage and mGPS were independent prognostic indicators for OS; T stage, M stage, mGPS and platelet count were independent prognostic indicators for PFS. Pretreatment mGPS is an easily measurable significant prognostic factor and can be used in combination with conventional TNM staging to predict survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

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Accession: 056408955

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 25258650

DOI: 10.7150/jca.9569


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