EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Trends from 1987 to 2004 in sudden death due to coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study



Trends from 1987 to 2004 in sudden death due to coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study



American Heart Journal 157(1): 46-52



Few data are available on the secular changes in sudden coronary heart disease (CHD) death in US communities. We examined trends in sudden CHD death from 1987 to 2004, using data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Sudden CHD deaths in residents of 4 communities aged 35 to 74 years were ascertained using multiple sources such as death certificates, informant and coroner interviews, and physician adjudications. Poisson regression was used to assess the trends for the 6 periods: 1987 to 1989, 1990 to 1992, 1993 to 1995, 1996 to 1998, 1999 to 2001, 2002 to 2004, after adjusting for demographic factors. Overall, 32.6% of CHD deaths were sudden, occurring within an hour after the onset of symptoms, 63.5% of which had no prior diagnosis of CHD. For women, the rate declined by 40% (P = .059) for sudden deaths with CHD history, 27% (P = .067) for those without CHD history, and 39% (P < .001) for nonsudden CHD deaths. The trends did not differ by community. For men, the trends differed by community for sudden deaths with and without CHD history (Ps for the interaction= .019 and .009, respectively) but not for nonsudden CHD death (P for the interaction= .10). For all communities combined, the decline in men was greatest for sudden deaths with CHD history (by 58%, P < .001), followed by nonsudden CHD deaths (by 39%, P < .001) and sudden deaths without CHD history (by 31%, P = .002). However, the proportion of CHD deaths that were sudden had remained stable over time. Although the rate of sudden CHD deaths, with and without CHD history, declined over time, the trend pattern may differ by community and gender.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 056684961

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19081395

DOI: 10.1016/j.ahj.2008.08.016



Related references

Coronary heart disease trends in four United States communities. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study 1987-1996. International Journal of Epidemiology 30(Supplement 1): S17-S22, 2001

Coronary heart disease trends in four United States communities. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study 1987-1996. International Journal of Epidemiology 30 Suppl 1(): S17-S22, 2002

Coronary heart disease trends in four Unitied States communities. The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study 1987-1996. International Journal of Epidemiology 30(Suppl 1): S17-S22, 2001

Validation of death certificate diagnosis for coronary heart disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 54(1): 40-50, 2001

The association of the ankle-brachial index with incident coronary heart disease: the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC) study, 1987-2001. Bmc Cardiovascular Disorders 7(): 3-3, 2007

Association of coronary heart disease incidence with carotid arterial wall thickness and major risk factors: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study, 1987-1993. American Journal of Epidemiology 146(6): 483-494, 1997

Electrocardiographic repolarization-related predictors of coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac deaths in men and women with cardiovascular disease in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Journal of Electrocardiology 48(1): 101-111, 2016

Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death Among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants. Journal of Family Issues 31(9): 1211-1229, 2010

Associations of lipoprotein cholesterols, apolipoproteins A-I and B, and triglycerides with carotid atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Arteriosclerosis and Thrombosis 14(7): 1098-1104, 1994

Coronary heart disease risk prediction in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 56(9): 880-890, 2003

Family history of coronary heart disease and pre-clinical carotid artery atherosclerosis in African-Americans and whites: the ARIC study: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities. Genetic Epidemiology 16(2): 165-178, 1999

Postprandial lipemia and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Bmj Open Diabetes Research & Care 5(1): E000335-E000335, 2017

CYP2J2 and CYP2C8 polymorphisms and coronary heart disease risk: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 17(5): 349-358, 2007

Serum uric acid and risk of coronary heart disease: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Annals of Epidemiology 10(3): 136-143, 2000

Is low magnesium concentration a risk factor for coronary heart disease? The atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC) study. American Heart Journal 136(3): 480-490, 1998