EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Usefulness of heart rate at rest as a predictor of mortality, hospitalization for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke in patients with stable coronary heart disease (Data from the Treating to New Targets [TNT] trial)



Usefulness of heart rate at rest as a predictor of mortality, hospitalization for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke in patients with stable coronary heart disease (Data from the Treating to New Targets [TNT] trial)



American Journal of Cardiology 105(7): 905-911



The heart rate at rest (HR) is a predictor of cardiovascular (CV) mortality. However, its effect on nonfatal CV events is unknown. The aim of the present post hoc analysis of the Treating New Targets (TNT) trial was to assess the effect of the HR at rest on major CV events in patients with stable coronary heart disease. A total of 9,580 subjects were included in the present analysis and were followed up for a median of 4.9 years. The rate of major CV events was 11.9% in those with a baseline HR of > or =70 beats/min versus 8.8% in those with a baseline HR of <70 beats/min. An increased HR at rest was associated with CV events, even after adjustment for differences in baseline characteristics (unadjusted hazard ratio 1.16 for every 10-beats/min increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10 to 1.23, p <0.0001; adjusted hazard ratio 1.08 per 10-beats/min increase, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.16, p = 0.018). A HR > or =70 beats/min was a significant independent predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.71, p = 0.001) and heart failure hospitalization (hazard ratio 2.30, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.95, p > or =0.0001). However, this association was not observed for stroke or myocardial infarction (p = 0.11 and p = 0.68, respectively). In conclusion, in patients with stable coronary heart disease, every 10-beats/min increase in the HR at rest was associated with an 8% increase in major CV events. In particular, a HR at rest of > or =70 beats/min was associated with a 40% increased risk of all-cause mortality and more than doubled the risk of heart failure hospitalization, but not the risk of stroke or myocardial infarction.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 056808425

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 20346304

DOI: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.11.035



Related references

Self-efficacy as a marker of cardiac function and predictor of heart failure hospitalization and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease: findings from the Heart and Soul Study. Health Psychology 28(2): 166-173, 2009

Usefulness of diastolic dominant pulmonary vein flow to predict hospitalization for heart failure and mortality in ambulatory patients with coronary heart disease (from the Heart and Soul Study). American Journal of Cardiology 103(4): 482-485, 2009

Prognostic value of left ventricular end-systolic volume index as a predictor of heart failure hospitalization in stable coronary artery disease: data from the Heart and Soul Study. Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography 22(2): 190-197, 2009

Association of resistin with heart failure and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease: data from the heart and soul study. Journal of Cardiac Failure 17(1): 24-30, 2011

Usefulness of left atrial volume index to predict heart failure hospitalization and mortality in ambulatory patients with coronary heart disease and comparison to left ventricular ejection fraction (from the Heart and Soul Study). American Journal of Cardiology 102(1): 70-76, 2008

Depression predicts mortality and hospitalization in patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure Data from the EPHESUS Trial. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 43(5 Supplement A): 179A-180A, March 3, 2004

Comparison of outcomes after hospitalization for worsening heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke in patients with heart failure and reduced and preserved ejection fraction. European Journal of Heart Failure 17(2): 169-176, 2015

Usefulness of noninvasive estimate of pulmonary vascular resistance to predict mortality, heart failure, and adverse cardiovascular events in Patients With stable coronary artery disease (from the Heart and Soul Study). American Journal of Cardiology 101(6): 762-766, 2008

Heart rate variability in patients with mild heart failure due to coronary artery disease. Comparison of patients with and without prior myocardial infarction. Journal of Electrocardiology 29 Suppl: 162-167, 1996

Adiponectin is associated with increased mortality and heart failure in patients with stable ischemic heart disease: data from the Heart and Soul Study. Atherosclerosis 220(2): 587-592, 2012

Blunted cyclic variation of heart rate predicts mortality risk in post-myocardial infarction, end-stage renal disease, and chronic heart failure patients. Europace 19(8): 1392-1400, 2016

Linear indices of heart rate variability in male patients with mild heart failure due to coronary artery disease Comparison of patients with and without prior myocardial infarction. European Heart Journal 17(ABSTR SUPPL ): 381, 1996

Targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with stable coronary heart disease: where are we now after the "treating to new targets" (TNT) trial?. Hellenic Journal of Cardiology 46(3): 161-164, 2005

Relation of obesity to heart failure hospitalization and cardiovascular events in persons with stable coronary heart disease (from the Heart and Soul Study). American Journal of Cardiology 104(7): 883-889, 2009

Is atrial fibrillation an independent predictor of 1-year mortality and hospitalization in patients with congestive heart failure? Data from Italian Network on congestive heart failure. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 33(2 SUPPL A): 191A, 1999