+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Validity of infrared tympanic temperature for the evaluation of heat strain while wearing impermeable protective clothing in hot environments



Validity of infrared tympanic temperature for the evaluation of heat strain while wearing impermeable protective clothing in hot environments



Industrial Health 49(6): 714-725



The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of infrared tympanic temperature (IR T(ty)) as a thermal index to evaluate the heat strain of workers in hot environments, in comparison with rectal temperatures at various depths (T(re-4, -8, and -16) for 4, 8 and 16 cm from the anal sphincter). Eight males underwent twelve experimental conditions: two activities (rest and exercise) × three clothing levels [Control, HDPE (high-density polyethylene coverall) and PVC (polyvinyl chloride coverall) condition] × two air temperatures (25 and 32℃ with 50%RH). The results showed that 1) in the conditions with most heat strain (HDPE or PVC condition at 32℃), IR T(ty) was equal to or even higher than T(re); 2) during exercise, physiological strain index (PSI) using IR T(ty) did not underestimate PSI-values using T(re-16), and overestimated those PSI-values from T(re-16) in HDPE and PVC conditions at 32℃; 3) during exercise, the relationships between IR T(ty) and heart and total sweat rate were stronger than those between T(re-16) and heart and total sweat rate. These results indicated that IR T(ty) is valid as a thermal index to evaluate the heat strain of workers wearing impermeable protective coveralls in hot environments. However, the application of IR T(ty) is limited only for strenuous works wearing encapsulated personal protective clothing with a hood in heat.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 056840218

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 22020015


Related references

Oral and tympanic temperature as heat strain indicators for workers wearing chemical protective clothing. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 26(5 SUPPL ): S178, 1994

Oral and tympanic temperatures as heat strain indicators for workers wearing chemical protective clothing. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal 57(4): 344-347, 1996

Thermal responses and physiological strain in men wearing impermeable and semipermeable protective clothing in the cold. Ergonomics 40(2): 141-150, 1997

Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA) accurately predicts individual-based core body temperature rise while wearing chemical protective clothing. Computers in Biology and Medicine 107: 131-136, 2019

Fan-precooling effect on heat strain while wearing protective clothing. International Journal of Biometeorology 58(9): 1919-1925, 2015

Effects of various protective clothing and thermal environments on heat strain of unacclimated men: the PHS (predicted heat strain) model revisited. Industrial Health 51(3): 266-274, 2014

Heat strain while wearing the current Canadian or a new hot-weather French NBC protective clothing ensemble. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine 67(11): 1057-1062, 1996

Reduction of isometric muscle endurance after wearing impermeable gas protective clothing. European Journal of Applied Physiology & Occupational Physiology 53(1): 76-80, 1984

Effects of endurance training and heat acclimation on psychological strain in exercising men wearing protective clothing. Ergonomics 41(3): 328-357, 1998

Age-related thermal strain in men while wearing radiation protective clothing during short-term exercise in the heat. International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics 10(4): 361-367, 2004

Body regional influences of L-menthol application on the alleviation of heat strain while wearing firefighter's protective clothing. European Journal of Applied Physiology 112(6): 2171-2183, 2012

Ability of the Wet Bulb Globe Temperature Index to predict heat stress in men wearing NBC protective clothing. Military Medicine 152(11): 554-556, 1987

Can perceptual indices estimate physiological strain across a range of environments and metabolic workloads when wearing explosive ordnance disposal and chemical protective clothing?. Physiology and Behavior 147: 71-77, 2016

The effect of hand immersion on body temperature when wearing impermeable clothing. Journal of the Royal Naval Medical Service 77(1): 41-47, 1991

Evaluation of tympanic temperature and thermal sensation responses during exercise to verify the positive effects of wearing germanium-coated functional clothing. Journal of Physical Therapy Science 28(6): 1860-1863, 2016