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WISC-IV profiles in children with traumatic brain injury: similarities to and differences from the WISC-III



WISC-IV profiles in children with traumatic brain injury: similarities to and differences from the WISC-III



Psychological Assessment 22(1): 57-64



The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV; D. Wechsler, 2003a) is often utilized to assess children with traumatic brain injury (TBI), although little information is available regarding its psychometric properties in these children. The current study examined WISC-IV performance in a sample of 61 children with TBI. As compared to the standardization sample, results indicated that the TBI group exhibited relative deficits on all subtest and index scores, with the greatest deficits on the Processing Speed Index (PSI) and Coding subtest scores. However, the Perceptual Reasoning Index score was not uniquely sensitive to brain injury, and the Cognitive Processing Index score was less sensitive to TBI than the PSI score. Also, the PSI did not uniquely predict learning and memory abilities, as had been reported in previous studies of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III; D. Wechsler, 1991). The present findings indicate substantive differences between the WISC-III and WISC-IV profiles of children with TBI.

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Accession: 056896752

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 20230152

DOI: 10.1037/a0016056


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