+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Calcium sources and their interaction with the different levels of non-phytate phosphorus affect performance and bone mineralization in broiler chickens



Calcium sources and their interaction with the different levels of non-phytate phosphorus affect performance and bone mineralization in broiler chickens



Poultry Science 94(9): 2136-2143



An experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of different Ca sources (limestone, Ca chloride, and Lipocal, a fat-encapsulated tricalcium phosphate, TCP) in conjunction with 4 dietary levels of non-phytate P (NPP) on performance, ileal digestibility of Ca and P, and bone mineralization in broiler chickens. Calcium sources were also evaluated in vitro to measure acid-binding capacity (ABC) and Ca solubility at different pH values. Ca chloride showed the highest solubility of Ca, with TCP showing the highest ABC. Ross male broiler-chicks were sorted by BW at 1 d post-hatch and assigned to 5 cages per diet with 5 birds per cage. Twelve diets were arranged in a 3×4 factorial of the 3 Ca sources and 4 levels of NPP (0.3%, 0.35%, 0.4% or 0.45%) consisting of 4 added P levels (Ca(H2PO4)2) with a high dose of phytase (1,150 U/kg) in all diets. On d 14 post-hatch, 3 birds were euthanized, and ileal digesta and the right tibia were collected to determine ileal Ca and P digestibility and bone mineralization, respectively. Feed intake (FI) and weight gain (WG) on d 14 was higher (P<0.01) with TCP and limestone than with Ca chloride. Added P increased the tibia weight and tibia ash content in chicks fed TCP up to 0.4% NPP and limestone up to 0.35% NPP. Calcium ileal digestibility was higher (P<0.01) with Ca chloride (73.7%) than with limestone (67.1%) or TCP (66.8%), which increased (P<0.05) with added levels of P from monocalcium phosphate. Phosphorus ileal digestibility was not affected by the Ca source and increased (P<0.001) with added levels of NPP. It can be concluded that starting broilers responded better to low-soluble Ca sources compared to high-soluble sources. A level of 0.35%-0.40% NPP with a high dose of phytase (1,150 U/kg) in diets including limestone or TCP is sufficient to guarantee performance and bone formation for broiler chickens from d 0 to d 14.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 057342905

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 25638469

DOI: 10.3382/ps/peu061


Related references

Effects of calcium to non-phytate phosphorus ratio and different sources of vitamin D on growth performance and bone mineralization in broiler chickens. Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia-Brazilian Journal of Animal Science 45(1): 1-7, 2016

Effect of dietary calcium concentrations in low non-phytate phosphorus diets containing phytase on growth performance, bone mineralization, litter quality, and footpad dermatitis incidence in growing broiler chickens. Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 30(7): 979-983, 2017

Effect of non-phytate phosphorus levels and phytase sources on the growth performance, serum biochemical and tibial parameters of broiler chickens. Italian Journal of Animal Science 12(3), 2013

Response of feeding different sources and levels of dietary phosphorus on morphometry and mineralization of tibia bone in broiler chickens. Indian Journal of Poultry Science 39(1): 66-71, 2004

Interaction between dietary calcium and non-phytate phosphorus levels on growth, bone mineralization and mineral excretion in commercial broilers. Animal Feed Science and Technology 131(1-2): 133-148, 2006

Efficacy of Phyzyme (R) XP phytase in broiler diets containing different levels of calcium and non-phytate phosphorus: performance, bone ash and mineral retention. Journal of Dairy Science 87: 151-151, 2004

Effect of different levels and sources of calcium and phosphorus on the fattening performance of broiler chickens kept in cages. Zivocisna vyroba Ceskoslovenska akademie zemedelska Ustav vedeckotechnickych informaci pro zemedelstvi 28(8): 599-605, 1983

Response of broiler chickens to different levels of calcium, non-phytate phosphorus and phytase. British Poultry Science 57(6): 799-809, 2016

Effects of dietary sources and levels of fat on performance nutrient retention and bone mineralization of broiler chicks fed two levels of calcium. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 69(2): 459-468, 1989

The effects of phytase supplementation on the performance of broiler chickens fed diets with different levels of non-phytate phosphorus. Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 14(2): 250-257, 2001

The effects of phytase supplementation on the performance of broiler chickens fed diets with different levels of non-phytate phosphorus. Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 14(2): 250-257, 2001

Studies on the availability of phytin phosphorus in broiler chicks. 2. Effects of various phosphorus sources and supplemental levels of organic phosphorus on calcium and phosphorus levels of bone and serum in broiler chicks. Korean Journal of Animal Sciences 28(3): 153-159, 1986

Effect of different non-phytate phosphorus levels and phytase sources on performance in broiler chicks. International Journal of Poultry Science 4(12): 1001-1005, 2005

Effect of non-phytate phosphorus levels and phytase sources on performance in broiler chicks. Proceedings of the 15th European Symposium on poultry nutrition, Balatonfured, Hungary, 25-29 September, 2005: 378-381, 2005

Effects of phytase supplementation on the performance of broiler chickens fed maize and wheat based diets with different levels of non-phytate phosphorus. Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 16(11): 1642-1649, 2003