+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Characterizing the Business Skills of the Public Health Workforce: Practical Implications From the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS)



Characterizing the Business Skills of the Public Health Workforce: Practical Implications From the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS)



Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 21 Suppl 6: S159-S167



Public health financial competencies are often overlooked or underrepresented in public health training programs. These skills are important for public health workforce members who are involved in managing resources and strategic planning and have been defined as key competencies by several national entities. To characterize business skills among state health agency employees and examine self-reported skill levels and their association with job satisfaction, worksite training and development opportunities, and annual salary. A cross-sectional survey, the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS), of state health agency central office employees was conducted in 2014. Multivariable logistic regression analyses, controlling for job classification, supervisory status, years of public health practice, annual compensation, educational attainment, geographic region, and sociodemographic status, were used to assess the relationship between business skills and training environment and job satisfaction. Linear regression was used to correlate business skills and annual compensation. A total of 10,246 state health agency staff completed a Web-based survey. Self-reported proficiency in business skills, job satisfaction, opportunities for training, and annual salary. The workforce reported high levels of proficiency in applying quality improvement concepts and managing change (67.5% and 69.2%, respectively). Half of the respondents reported proficiency in budget skills (49.3%). Participants who were proficient in applying quality improvement concepts were significantly more likely to report job satisfaction (OR = 1.27). A supportive training environment was significantly associated with business competencies (range of OR = 1.08-1.11). Managing change (β = .15) and budget skill proficiency (β = .37) were significantly associated with increased yearly compensation. Public health workers who self-report proficiency with business skills report increased job satisfaction, higher annual salary, and a supportive training environment. These findings support the need for the development of appropriately designed business skill training opportunities to increase competencies in this critical domain.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 057391823

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 26422486

DOI: 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000314


Related references

The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS 2017): An Expanded Perspective on the State Health Agency Workforce. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 25 Suppl 2, Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey 2017: S16-S25, 2019

Do Accredited State Health Agency Public Health Workforce Development Plans Align With the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey?. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 24 Suppl 3 Supplement, Impact of Public Health Accreditation: S83-S85, 2018

The First Nationally Representative Benchmark of the Local Governmental Public Health Workforce: Findings From the 2017 Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 25 Suppl 2, Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey 2017: S26-S37, 2019

Characterizing Informatics Roles and Needs of Public Health Workers: Results From the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 21 Suppl 6: S130-S140, 2017

Public Health Informatics in Local and State Health Agencies: An Update From the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 25 Suppl 2, Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey 2017: S67-S77, 2019

The UK Public Health Skills and Career Framework--could it help to make public health the business of every workforce?. Public Health 122(6): 541-544, 2008

Prioritizing the Public Health Workforce: Harnessing PH WINS Data in Local Health Departments for Workforce Development. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 25 Suppl 2, Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey 2017: S183-S184, 2019

Health Resources and Services Administration Perspective on the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 21 Suppl 6: S9-10, 2017

The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey: The First National Survey of State Health Agency Employees. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 21 Suppl 6: S13-S27, 2017

From Survey to Assessment: Characterizing Michigan's Public Health Workforce. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 2009, 2009

Educational Attainment of the Public Health Workforce and Its Implications for Workforce Development. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 21 Suppl 6: S56-S68, 2017

Survey of accredited master of public health (MPH) programs with health education concentrations: a resource for strengthening the public health workforce. Health Promotion Practice 7(2): 258-265, 2006

Confronting the public health workforce crisis: ASPH statement on the public health workforce. Public Health Reports 123(3): 395-398, 2008

Supplement 1: Public Health Preparedness: An Academic and Practice Partnership || Development and Implementation of a Public Health Workforce Training Needs Assessment Survey in North Carolina. Public Health Reports 120: 28-34, 2005

Changing demographics of public health graduates: potential implications for the public health workforce. Public Health Reports 120(3): 355-357, 2005