+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Chemical Composition of Aerosol from an E-Cigarette: A Quantitative Comparison with Cigarette Smoke



Chemical Composition of Aerosol from an E-Cigarette: A Quantitative Comparison with Cigarette Smoke



Chemical Research in Toxicology 29(10): 1662-1678



There is interest in the relative toxicities of emissions from electronic cigarettes and tobacco cigarettes. Lists of cigarette smoke priority toxicants have been developed to focus regulatory initiatives. However, a comprehensive assessment of e-cigarette chemical emissions including all tobacco smoke Harmful and Potentially Harmful Constituents, and additional toxic species reportedly present in e-cigarette emissions, is lacking. We examined 150 chemical emissions from an e-cigarette (Vype ePen), a reference tobacco cigarette (Ky3R4F), and laboratory air/method blanks. All measurements were conducted by a contract research laboratory using ISO 17025 accredited methods. The data show that it is essential to conduct laboratory air/method measurements when measuring e-cigarette emissions, owing to the combination of low emissions and the associated impact of laboratory background that can lead to false-positive results and overestimates. Of the 150 measurands examined in the e-cigarette aerosol, 104 were not detected and 21 were present due to laboratory background. Of the 25 detected aerosol constituents, 9 were present at levels too low to be quantified and 16 were generated in whole or in part by the e-cigarette. These comprised major e-liquid constituents (nicotine, propylene glycol, and glycerol), recognized impurities in Pharmacopoeia-quality nicotine, and eight thermal decomposition products of propylene glycol or glycerol. By contrast, approximately 100 measurands were detected in mainstream cigarette smoke. Depending on the regulatory list considered and the puffing regime used, the emissions of toxicants identified for regulation were from 82 to >99% lower on a per-puff basis from the e-cigarette compared with those from Ky3R4F. Thus, the aerosol from the e-cigarette is compositionally less complex than cigarette smoke and contains significantly lower levels of toxicants. These data demonstrate that e-cigarettes can be developed that offer the potential for substantially reduced exposure to cigarette toxicants. Further studies are required to establish whether the potential lower consumer exposure to these toxicants will result in tangible public health benefits.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 057393334

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 27641760

DOI: 10.1021/acs.chemrestox.6b00188


Related references

Toxicological comparison of cigarette smoke and e-cigarette aerosol using a 3D in vitro human respiratory model. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 103: 314-324, 2019

Studies on the relationship of leaf tobacco composition to the composition of cigarette smoke. 1. Possibility of the estimation of tar content in cigarette smoke from the chemical composition of tobacco leaves. Scientific Papers of the Central Research Institute, Japan Monopoly Corporation (113): 89-97, 1971

A Comparison of Flavorless Electronic Cigarette-Generated Aerosol and Conventional Cigarette Smoke on the Survival and Growth of Common Oral Commensal Streptococci. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16(10):, 2019

Effect of cigarette filters on the chemical composition and in vitro biological activity of cigarette mainstream smoke. Food and Chemical Toxicology 47(1): 192-197, 2009

A comparison of the mutagenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke condensates from a representative sample of the U.S. cigarette market with a Kentucky reference cigarette (K1R4F). Mutation Research 342(3-4): 179-190, 1995

Chemical analysis and in vitro toxicological evaluation of aerosol from a novel tobacco vapor product: A comparison with cigarette smoke. Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology 92: 94-103, 2018

Comparison of dermal tumor promotion activity of cigarette smoke condensate from prototype (heated) cigarette and reference (combusted) cigarette in SENCAR mice. Food and Chemical Toxicology 72: 187-194, 2014

Neutron activation analysis in tobacco and cigarette smoke studies 2r 1 cigarette composition smoke transference and butt filtration. Beitraege zur Tabakforschung International 13(2): 59-66, 1985

A Microcontroller Operated Device for the Generation of Liquid Extracts from Conventional Cigarette Smoke and Electronic Cigarette Aerosol. Journal of Visualized Experiments 2018(131):, 2018

Comparison of the inhalation toxicity of kretek (clove cigarette) smoke with that of American cigarette smoke. II. Fourteen days, exposure. Archives of Toxicology 64(7): 515-521, 1990

DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke condensate in vitro as assayed by 32P-postlabeling. Comparison with cigarette smoke-associated DNA adduct profiles in vivo. Mutation Research 268(1): 139-153, 1992

Induction of Metallothionein Expression After Exposure to Conventional Cigarette Smoke but Not Electronic Cigarette (ECIG)-Generated Aerosol in Caenorhabditis elegans. Frontiers in Physiology 9: 426, 2018

Cigarette smoke but not electronic cigarette aerosol activates a stress response in human coronary artery endothelial cells in culture. Drug and Alcohol Dependence 163: 256-260, 2016

Studies on the relationship of leaf tobacco composition to the composition of cigarette smoke. 2. Correlations of mineral content with the tar content of cigarette smoke and the combustibility of cigarettes. Scientific Papers of the Central Research Institute, Japan Monopoly Corporation (113): 179-183, 1971

Comparison of the inhalation toxicity of kretek (clove cigarette) smoke with that of American cigarette smoke. I. One day exposure. Archives of Toxicology 63(1): 1-6, 1989