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Employer Satisfaction With an Injured Employee's Health Care: How Does It Affect the Selection of an Occupational Health Care Provider?



Employer Satisfaction With an Injured Employee's Health Care: How Does It Affect the Selection of an Occupational Health Care Provider?



Professional Case Management 21(2): 63



The purpose of this article is to explore the most important factors that an employer utilizes in selecting an occupational health care provider for their employees injured on the job. The primary practice setting is the attending physician's office who is an occupational health care provider. The responding employers deemed "work restrictions given after each office visit" as their most important factor in selecting an occupational health care provider, with a score of 43. This was followed in order in the "very important" category by communication, appointment availability, employee return to work within nationally recognized guidelines, tied were medical provider professionalism and courtesy with diagnostics ordered timely, next was staff professionalism and courtesy, and tied with 20 responses in the "very important" category were wait time and accurate billing by the provider.The selection of an occupational health care provider in the realm of workers' compensation plays a monumental role in the life of a claim for the employer. Safe and timely return to work is in the best interest of the employer and their injured employee. For the employer, it can represent hard dollars saved in indemnity payments and insurance premiums when the employee can return to some form of work. For the injured employee, it can have a positive impact on their attitude of going back to work as they will feel they are a valued asset to their employer. The case managers, who are the "eyes and ears" for the employer in the field of workers' compensation, have a valuable role in a successful outcome of dollars saved and appropriate care rendered for the employees' on the job injury. The employers in the study were looking for case managers who could ensure their employees received quality care but that this care is cost-effective. The case manager can be instrumental in assisting the employer in developing and monitoring a "stay-at-work" program, thereby reducing the financial exposure for the employer.

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Accession: 057759024

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 26844713

DOI: 10.1097/ncm.0000000000000137


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