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Empowering nurses with evidence-based practice environments: surveying Magnet®, Pathway to Excellence®, and non-magnet facilities in one healthcare system



Empowering nurses with evidence-based practice environments: surveying Magnet®, Pathway to Excellence®, and non-magnet facilities in one healthcare system



Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing 12(1): 12-21



Nurses have an essential role in implementing evidence-based practices (EBP) that contribute to high-quality outcomes. It remains unknown how healthcare facilities can increase nurse engagement in EBP. To determine whether individual or organizational qualities could be identified that were related to registered nurses' (RNs') readiness for EBP as measured by their reported EBP barriers, ability, desire, and frequency of behaviors. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was used in which a convenience sample of 2,441 nurses within one United States healthcare system completed a modified version of the Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, t tests, one-way ANOVA, and regression modeling were used to analyze the data. RNs employed by facilities designated by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) as Magnet® or Pathway to Excellence® reported significantly fewer barriers to EBP than those RNs employed by non designated facilities. RNs in Magnet organizations had higher desire for EBP than Pathway to Excellence or non designated facilities. RNs educated at the baccalaureate level or higher reported significantly fewer barriers to EBP than nurses with less education; they also had higher EBP ability, desire, and frequency of behaviors. A predictive model found higher EBP readiness scores among RNs who participated in research, had specialty certifications, and engaged in a clinical career development program. Education, research, and certification standards promoted by the Magnet program may provide a nursing workforce that is better prepared for EBP. Organizations should continue structural supports that increase professional development and research opportunities so nurses are empowered to practice at their full capacity.

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Accession: 057759327

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PMID: 25598144

DOI: 10.1111/wvn.12077


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