+ Site Statistics
References:
52,654,530
Abstracts:
29,560,856
PMIDs:
28,072,755
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel: dosemeters, calibration and practical aspects of H p (3) monitoring. A 2015 review



Eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel: dosemeters, calibration and practical aspects of H p (3) monitoring. A 2015 review



Journal of Radiological Protection 35(3): R17-R34



A thorough literature review about the current situation on the implementation of eye lens monitoring has been performed in order to provide recommendations regarding dosemeter types, calibration procedures and practical aspects of eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel. Most relevant data and recommendations from about 100 papers have been analysed and classified in the following topics: challenges of today in eye lens monitoring; conversion coefficients, phantoms and calibration procedures for eye lens dose evaluation; correction factors and dosemeters for eye lens dose measurements; dosemeter position and influence of protective devices. The major findings of the review can be summarised as follows: the recommended operational quantity for the eye lens monitoring is H p (3). At present, several dosemeters are available for eye lens monitoring and calibration procedures are being developed. However, in practice, very often, alternative methods are used to assess the dose to the eye lens. A summary of correction factors found in the literature for the assessment of the eye lens dose is provided. These factors can give an estimation of the eye lens dose when alternative methods, such as the use of a whole body dosemeter, are used. A wide range of values is found, thus indicating the large uncertainty associated with these simplified methods. Reduction factors from most common protective devices obtained experimentally and using Monte Carlo calculations are presented. The paper concludes that the use of a dosemeter placed at collar level outside the lead apron can provide a useful first estimate of the eye lens exposure. However, for workplaces with estimated annual equivalent dose to the eye lens close to the dose limit, specific eye lens monitoring should be performed. Finally, training of the involved medical staff on the risks of ionising radiation for the eye lens and on the correct use of protective systems is strongly recommended.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 057851419

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 26343787

DOI: 10.1088/0952-4746/35/3/R17


Related references

Evaluation of the calibration procedure of active personal dosemeters for interventional radiology. Radiation Protection Dosimetry 131(1): 87-92, 2008

On the scenario of passive dosimeters in personnel monitoring: Relevance to diagnostic radiology and fluoroscopy-based interventional cardiology. Journal of Medical Physics 41(2): 81-84, 2016

Calibration of an eye lens dosemeter in terms of Hp(3) to be used in interventional radiology. Radiation Physics and Chemistry 104: 45-47, 2014

The Canadian National Calibration Reference Centre for In-Vivo Monitoring. Part II: Sources of errors in thyroid monitoring of occupationally exposed personnel. Canadian Journal of Medical Radiation Technology 25(1): 21-24, 1994

Eye lens dose monitoring in the UK nuclear industry using active personal dosemeters. Journal of Radiological Protection, 2017

Occupational exposure to the whole body, extremities and to the eye lens in interventional radiology in Poland, as based on personnel dosimetry records at IFJ PAN. Radiation Physics and Chemistry 104: 72-75, 2014

The Canadian National Calibration Reference Centre for In-Vivo Monitoring: thyroid monitoring. Part III: A basic calibration procedure for thyroid monitoring. Canadian Journal of Medical Radiation Technology 25(2): 61-63, 1994

Practical aspects in data monitoring: a brief review. Statistics in Medicine 6(7): 753-760, 1987

Vigilance monitoring--review and practical aspects. Biomedizinische Technik. Biomedical Engineering 52(1): 77-82, 2007

Intercomparison of active personal dosemeters in interventional radiology. Radiation Protection Dosimetry 129(1-3): 340-345, 2008

New Aspects of Environmental Monitoring Using Flat Phosphate Glass and Thermoluminescence Dosemeters. Radiation Protection Dosimetry 66(1): 187-192, 1996

Monitoring dose to the patient during interventional radiology. Health Physics 74(6 SUPPL ): S41-S42, June, 1998

Patient dose monitoring in interventional radiology. Health Physics 74(6 SUPPL ): S56-S57, June, 1998

Characterization of workplaces in interventional radiology using active dosemeters ALARA OD. Radiation Protection Dosimetry 125(1-4): 379-382, 2007

Personnel monitoring in diagnostic radiology. British Journal of Radiology 46(551): 1011-1012, 1973