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Improving the Acquisition of Basic Technical Surgical Skills with VR-Based Simulation Coupled with Computer-Based Video Instruction



Improving the Acquisition of Basic Technical Surgical Skills with VR-Based Simulation Coupled with Computer-Based Video Instruction



Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 220: 323-328



Next to practice, feedback is the most important variable in skill acquisition. Feedback can vary in content and the way that it is used for delivery. Health professions education research has extensively examined the different effects provided by the different feedback methodologies. In this paper we compared two different types of knowledge of performance (KP) feedback. The first type was video-based KP feedback while the second type consisted of computer generated KP feedback. Results of this study showed that computer generated performance feedback is more effective than video based performance feedback. The combination of the two feedback methodologies provides trainees with a better understanding.

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Accession: 058076538

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PMID: 27046599


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