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Accuracy of name and age data provided about network members in a social network study of people who use drugs: implications for constructing sociometric networks



Accuracy of name and age data provided about network members in a social network study of people who use drugs: implications for constructing sociometric networks



Annals of Epidemiology 26(11): 802-809



Network analysis has become increasingly popular in epidemiologic research, but the accuracy of data key to constructing risk networks is largely unknown. Using network data from people who use drugs (PWUDs), the study examined how accurately PWUD reported their network members' (i.e., alters') names and ages. Data were collected from 2008 to 2010 from 503 PWUD residing in rural Appalachia. Network ties (n = 897) involved recent (past 6 months) sex, drug cousage, and/or social support. Participants provided alters' names, ages, and relationship-level characteristics; these data were cross-referenced to that of other participants to identify participant-participant relationships and to determine the accuracy of reported ages (years) and names (binary). Participants gave alters' exact names and ages within two years in 75% and 79% of relationships, respectively. Accurate name was more common in relationships that were reciprocally reported and those involving social support and male alters. Age was more accurate in reciprocal ties and those characterized by kinship, sexual partnership, recruitment referral, and financial support, and less accurate for ties with older alters. Most participants reported alters' characteristics accurately, and name accuracy was not significantly different in relationships involving drug-related and/or sexual behavior compared to those not involving these behaviors.

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Accession: 059308827

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 28126091

DOI: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.09.010


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