+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Bartonella henselae infection, the importance of images for diagnosis and follow-up



Bartonella henselae infection, the importance of images for diagnosis and follow-up



Revista Chilena de Infectologia 34(4): 410-412



Bartonella henselae infection is a frequent zoonosis from the domestic cat. It is presented with regional lymphadenitis in the majority of cases. Searching and characterization of lymph nodes by diagnostic imaging can be useful in the differential diagnosis approach, with a clear advantage, because it is a noninvasive method. Currently, new diagnostic imaging techniques improves the quality of screening and characterization of adenopathies, such is the case of PET/CT, which allows a better evaluation of hypermetabolic lymph nodes, without considering the individual growth of each lymph node. In this article, three cases of cat scratch diseases serology and their respective imaging findings are reviewed.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 059435503

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 29165524

DOI: 10.4067/s0716-10182017000400410


Related references

Diagnosis and follow-up of Bartonella henselae infection in the spleen of an immunocompetent patient by real-time quantitative PCR. Journal of Medical Microbiology 62(Pt 7): 1081-1085, 2013

Images in clinical medicine. Optic neuritis due to Bartonella henselae infection. New England Journal of Medicine 350(2): E1, 2004

Prevalence of Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae and the 16S rRNA gene types of Bartonella henselae among pet cats in Japan. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 62(3): 273-279, 2000

Coinfection with Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella henselae and with different Bartonella henselae strains in domestic cats. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 35(8): 2120-2123, 1997

Infection of human CD34+ progenitor cells with Bartonella henselae results in intraerythrocytic presence of B. henselae. Blood 106(4): 1215-1222, 2005

Experimental infection of dogs with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology 156(1-2): 153-158, 2013

Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae infection in domestic cats from The Philippines. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 60(4): 593-597, 1999

Efficacy of enrofloxacin or doxycycline for treatment of Bartonella henselae or Bartonella clarridgeiae infection in cats. Antimicrobial Agents and ChemoTherapy 41(11): 2448-2455, 1997

Clinical and pathologic evaluation of chronic Bartonella henselae or Bartonella clarridgeiae infection in cats. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 37(5): 1536-1547, 1999

Experimental infection of horses with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella bovis. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 26(2): 377-383, 2012

Infection and re-infection of domestic cats with various Bartonella species or types: B. henselae type I is protective against heterologous challenge with B. henselae type II. Veterinary Microbiology 92(1/2): 73-86, 2003

Infection and re-infection of domestic cats with various Bartonella species or types: B. henselae type I is protective against heterologous challenge with B. henselae type II. Veterinary Microbiology 92(1-2): 73-86, 2003

Challenges in the diagnosis of culture negative vertebral osteomyelitis in adults: case of Bartonella henselae infection. Joint Bone Spine 80(6): 671-673, 2013

Canine bartonellosis: serological and molecular prevalence in Brazil and evidence of co-infection with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. Veterinary Research 38(5): 697-710, 2007

Granulomatous hepatitis and necrotizing splenitis due to Bartonella henselae in a patient with cancer: case report and review of hepatosplenic manifestations of bartonella infection. Clinical Infectious Diseases 22(6): 951-957, 1996