+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Cerebrospinal fluid neural cell adhesion molecule levels and their correlation with clinical variables in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder



Cerebrospinal fluid neural cell adhesion molecule levels and their correlation with clinical variables in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder



Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 76: 12-18



Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays an important role in neural plasticity, and its altered function has been implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, previous studies have yielded inconsistent results on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NCAM levels in psychiatric disorders. The aim of our study was to examine CSF NCAM levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder (BD), and major depressive disorder (MDD), and their possible relationship with clinical variables. The participants comprised 85 patients with schizophrenia, 57 patients with BD, 83 patients with MDD and 111 healthy controls, all matched for age, sex, and Japanese ethnicity. The CSF samples were drawn using a lumbar puncture and NCAM levels were quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Analysis of covariance controlling for age and sex revealed that CSF NCAM levels were lower in all patients (p=0.033), and in those with BD (p=0.039), than in the controls. NCAM levels positively correlated with age in patients with BD (p<0.01), MDD (p<0.01), and the controls (p<0.01). NCAM levels negatively correlated with depressive symptom scores in patients with BD (p=0.040). In patients with schizophrenia, NCAM levels correlated negatively with negative symptom scores (p=0.029), and correlated positively with scores for cognitive functions such as category fluency (p=0.011) and letter fluency (p=0.023) scores. We showed that CSF NCAM levels were lower in psychiatric patients, particularly bipolar patients than in the controls. Furthermore, we found correlations of NCAM levels with clinical symptoms in patients with BD and in those with schizophrenia, suggesting the involvement of central NCAM in the symptom formation of severe psychiatric disorders.

(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 059482963

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 28238731

DOI: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.02.016


Related references

Relationships of Cerebrospinal Fluid Monoamine Metabolite Levels With Clinical Variables in Major Depressive Disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 78(8): E947-E956, 2017

Differential melatonin alterations in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Comprehensive Psychiatry 68: 34-39, 2017

Increased cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 levels in patients with schizophrenia and those with major depressive disorder. Journal of Psychiatric Research 47(3): 401-406, 2014

Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder. Bipolar Disorders 13(7-8): 701-707, 2012

Theory of mind impairment and its clinical correlates in patients with schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia Research 2017, 2017

Distribution and levels of 5-HT 1B receptors in anterior cingulate cortex of patients with bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia - An autoradiography study. European Neuropsychopharmacology 27(5): 504-514, 2017

Cerebrospinal fluid BDNF pro-peptide levels in major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Journal of Psychiatric Research 113: 190-198, 2019

Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid G72 protein levels in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. Psychiatry Research 254: 244-250, 2017

Increased cerebrospinal fluid complement C5 levels in major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 497(2): 683-688, 2018

Comparative Study of Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, or Major Depressive Disorder. Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience 11(3): 137-143, 2014

Routine clinical assessment of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder. European Neuropsychopharmacology 24(1): 133-141, 2014

Prospective study of clinical predictors of suicidal acts after a major depressive episode in patients with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder. American Journal of Psychiatry 161(8): 1433-1441, 2004

Systematic review of appropriate cognitive assessment instruments used in clinical trials of schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Psychiatry Research 216(3): 291-302, 2014

Sedentary behavior and physical activity levels in people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a global systematic review and meta-analysis. World Psychiatry 16(3): 308-315, 2017

The Diagnostic Stability of DSM-IV Diagnoses: An Examination of Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar I Disorder, and Schizophrenia in Korean Patients. Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience 9(3): 117-121, 2011