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Does Adding Intravenous Phosphorus to Parenteral Nutrition Has Any Effects on Calcium and Phosphorus Metabolism and Bone Mineral Content in Preterm Neonates?



Does Adding Intravenous Phosphorus to Parenteral Nutrition Has Any Effects on Calcium and Phosphorus Metabolism and Bone Mineral Content in Preterm Neonates?



Acta Medica Iranica 55(6): 395-398



The use of parenteral nutritional supplementation of phosphorus may lead to exhibit higher plasma phosphate concentrations and less radiological features in premature neonates susceptible to osteopenia. The present study aimed to assess the beneficial effects of adding intravenous phosphorus to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) on calcium and phosphorus metabolism in preterm neonates by measuring bone mineral content. This open-labeled randomized clinical trial was conducted on premature neonates who were hospitalized at NICU. The neonates were randomly assigned to two groups received TPN with intravenous sodium glycerophosphate or Glycophos (1.5 mmol/kg/day) or TPN without sodium glycerophosphate. At the end of the four weeks of treatment, the presence of osteopenia was examined using DEXA Scan. After completing treatment protocols, the group received TPN with intravenous Glycophos had significantly lower serum alkaline phosphatase (360±60 versus 762±71, P<0.001), as well as higher serum calcium to creatinine ratio (1.6±0.3 versus 0.44±0.13, P<0.001) compared to the control group received TPN without Glycophos. Those who received TPN with intravenous Glycophos experienced more increase in bone mineral density than those in control group (0.13±0.01 versus 0.10±0.02, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in serum calcium and serum vitamin D between the case and control groups. Adding intravenous sodium glycerophosphate to TPN in premature neonates can compensate the lack of bone mineral content and help to prevent osteopenia.

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Accession: 059624018

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PMID: 28843241


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