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Impact of mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI) on central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in department of hematology at single university hospital in Japan



Impact of mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI) on central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in department of hematology at single university hospital in Japan



Journal of Infection and ChemoTherapy



Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are among the most serious complications especially in blood cancer patients. In January 2013, Centers for Disease and Prevention (CDC) introduced a new surveillance definition of mucosal barrier injury-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI). This study was to determine the impact of MBI-LCBI on CLABSIs and compare the clinical characteristics of MBI versus non-MBI-LCBI cases. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 250 consecutive patients. They were admitted in department of hematology at Aichi Medical University Hospital. We applied the revised 2013 CLABSI surveillance protocol to all CLABSI cases identified during the 47-months period from May 2012 through June 2016. A total of 44 CLABSIs were identified. The median patient age was 65 years (range, 12 to 89). Among 44 patients, 31 patients were diagnosed as leukemia (70.5%) and 12 patients as lymphoma (27.3%). Six patients underwent bone transplantation for leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (13.6%). A total of 20 patients (45.5%) were classified as MBI-LCBI and 24 (54.5%) were classified as non-MBI-LCBI. The primary disease type (P = 0.018), neutropenic within 3 days before CLABSI (MBI-LCBI vs. non-MBI-LCBI: 95.0% vs. 26.3%, P = <0.0001), line(s) removed owing to CLABSI (15.0% vs. 54.2%, P = 0.011) and Gram-negative organisms cultured (70.0% vs. 37.5%, P = 0.004) showed significantly difference between the groups. Our data showed that MBI-LCBI cases account for 45.5% of the CLABSI cases identified in blood cancer patients, and constituted a significant burden to this high-risk patient population.

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Accession: 059837569

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 29066217

DOI: 10.1016/j.jiac.2017.08.013


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