+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Poor nutrition from first foods: A cross-sectional study of complementary feeding of infants and young children in six remote Aboriginal communities across northern Australia



Poor nutrition from first foods: A cross-sectional study of complementary feeding of infants and young children in six remote Aboriginal communities across northern Australia



Nutrition and Dietetics: the Journal of the Dietitians Association of Australia 74(5): 436-445



To describe the first foods of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infants and young children who were recruited to a nutrition promotion and anaemia prevention program conducted from 2010 to 2012, in six remote communities across northern Australia. Food records (24-hour diet history, food variety checklist) were completed on recruitment by interview with a parent or carer. Cross-sectional analysis assessed the proportion of participants consuming recommended and not-recommended foods and drinks and meeting recommendations for meal frequency and dietary diversity. Of 245 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander participants aged 6-24 months, 227 (92.7%) had a recruitment food record. On the previous day, most (67.4%) had breastmilk, nearly all (98.2%) ate solid food, but only 13% ate fruit, 33% had neither fruit nor vegetables, and 25% had sweet drinks. Children living in smaller households (3-5 people) were more likely to meet the criteria for frequency of meals than those living in larger households of 12-31 people (93% vs 78%, P = 0.012 for trend over household size). Only 30% met the criteria for dietary diversity. Where information was available (n = 91), dietary diversity was adequate more often in 'pay week' compared to 'not pay week' (31.3% vs 9.3%, P = 0.007). Support for current beneficial breast-feeding practices and promotion of nutrient-dense complementary foods, need to be embedded in initiatives for improved family food security. Good nutrition in early life can reduce the disparity in health, education and economic status between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 060105555

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 29027330

DOI: 10.1111/1747-0080.12386


Related references

Otitis media in young Aboriginal children from remote communities in Northern and Central Australia: a cross-sectional survey. Bmc Pediatrics 5: 27, 2005

Disease burden and health-care clinic attendances for young children in remote aboriginal communities of northern Australia. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 86(4): 275-281, 2008

Disease burden and health-care climic attendances for young children in remote Aboriginal communities of northern Australia. Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 86(4): 275-281, 2008

A cross-sectional survey of environmental health in remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia. International Journal of Environmental Health Research 26(5-6): 525-535, 2017

An assessment of dental caries among young Aboriginal children in New South Wales, Australia: a cross-sectional study. Bmc Public Health 15: 1314, 2016

Remote links: Redesigning maternity care for Aboriginal women from remote communities in Northern Australia - A comparative cohort study. Midwifery 34: 47-57, 2017

Clinic attendances during the first 12 months of life for Aboriginal children in five remote communities of northern Australia. Plos One 8(3): E58231, 2013

A regional initiative to reduce skin infections amongst aboriginal children living in remote communities of the Northern Territory, Australia. Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases 3(11): E554, 2010

Timely initiation of complementary feeding and associated factors among children aged 6 to 12 months in Northern Ethiopia: an institution-based cross-sectional study. Bmc Public Health 13: 1050, 2014

Five-year longitudinal study of cannabis users in three remote Aboriginal communities in Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Drug and Alcohol Review 28(6): 623-630, 2010

Use of health services by remote dwelling Aboriginal infants in tropical northern Australia: a retrospective cohort study. Bmc Pediatrics 12: 19, 2012

Absent otoacoustic emissions predict otitis media in young Aboriginal children: a birth cohort study in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in an arid zone of Western Australia. Bmc Pediatrics 8: 32, 2008

An analysis of the use of plant products for commerce in remote Aboriginal communities of northern Australia. Economic Botany 60(4): 362-373, 2006

Growth of aboriginal infants in the first year of life in remote communities in north-west Australia. Annals of Human Biology 15(5): 375-382, 1988

Dermatological learning needs among aboriginal health workers in rural and remote Australia: A cross-sectional survey. Australasian Journal of Dermatology 59(1): E84-E86, 2017