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Retrospective evaluation of the prevalence, risk factors, management, outcome, and necropsy findings of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in dogs and cats: 29 cases (2011-2013)



Retrospective evaluation of the prevalence, risk factors, management, outcome, and necropsy findings of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome in dogs and cats: 29 cases (2011-2013)



Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care 27(6): 662-673



To determine the prevalence and risk factors for veterinary acute lung injury (VetALI) and veterinary acute respiratory distress syndrome (VetARDS), assess mechanical ventilation settings and patient outcomes, and to evaluate the relationship of clinical diagnoses with necropsy findings. Retrospective study. University teaching hospital. Twenty-four dogs and 5 cats with a clinical diagnosis of VetALI or VetARDS. Control population includes 24 dogs and 5 cats with a clinical diagnosis of respiratory disease other than VetALI or VetARDS. None. VetALI and VetARDS were diagnosed in 3.2% of dogs and 1.3% of cats presenting to the ICU. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome was the most common inciting condition (16/24 dogs, 2/5 cats), followed by vomiting and subsequent aspiration of gastric contents (9/24 dogs), sepsis (5/24 dogs, 3/5 cats), multiple transfusions (4/24 dogs), trauma (3/24 dogs), and adverse drug reactions (1/24 dogs, 1/5 cats).  None of these conditions were found to be significantly associated with a risk of development of VetALI or VetARDS when compared to controls. Twelve dogs (50%) and 4 cats (80%) underwent mechanical ventilation for a median duration of 18 hours in dogs (range: 6-174 h) and 15.5 hours in cats (range: 6-91 h). Overall, 3/29 patients survived to discharge including 2/24 dogs and 1/5 cats. Necropsy results were available for 8/22 dogs and 3/4 cats. A total of 6/8 dogs (75%) dogs and 3/3 (100%) cats met the histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of VetALI or VetARDS. VetALI and VetARDS can cause life-threatening respiratory distress in dogs and cats necessitating mechanical ventilation in 50% of dogs and 80% of cats in this study. These diseases are associated with a poor clinical outcome and a high rate of humane euthanasia.

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Accession: 060204273

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PMID: 28873275

DOI: 10.1111/vec.12648


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