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The association between social factors, employment status and self-reported back pain A representative prevalence study on the German general population



The association between social factors, employment status and self-reported back pain A representative prevalence study on the German general population



Journal of Public Health 13(1): 30-39




(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 063416121

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1007/s10389-004-0085-7


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