+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

High-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score (HS-mGPS) Is superior to the mGPS in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy



High-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score (HS-mGPS) Is superior to the mGPS in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy



Oncotarget 8(59): 99861-99870



The present study compared the prognostic value of the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) and high-sensitivity mGPS (HS-mGPS) in unresectable locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcimona (LAESCC) patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The baseline data of 163 eligible patients were retrospectively collected. Patients with a C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤ 10 mg/l and albumin ≥ 35 g/l were allocated to mGPS-0 group. Patients with only elevated CRP (> 10 mg/l) were assigned to mGPS-1 group. Patients who had both elevated CRP (> 10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminurea (< 35 g/l) were assigned to mGPS-2 group. The HS-mGPS was calculated based on cutoff values of 3mg/l for CRP and the same value (35 g/l) for albumin. Prognostic significance for both tumor response and overall survival (OS) was analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. The mGPS was 0 in 95 patients, 1 in 28 patient and 2 in 40 patients. In contrast, the HS-mGPS was 0 in 66 patients, 1 in 47 patients and 2 in 50 patients. In multivariate analysis, the HS-mGPS was the only positive factor for tumor response (P = 0.015). Both the mGPS (P < 0.001) and HS-mGPS (P < 0.001) were good prognostic predictors for OS. However, the HS-mGPS was found to be a superior prognostic predictor compared to the mGPS in a multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the pretreatment HS-mGPS is a strong prognosticator superior to the mGPS for both tumor response and OS in LAESCC patients who received CCRT.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 065195928

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 29245945


Related references

Predictive and Prognostic significance of high-sensitivity modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (HS-mGPS) in advanced gastric cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi 39(3): 195-200, 2017

Does the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) have a prognostic role in esophageal cancer?. Journal of Surgical Oncology 113(7): 732-737, 2016

Comparison of the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) and the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in evaluating the prognosis of patients with operable and inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology 142(6): 1285-1297, 2016

Onodera's prognostic nutritional index(PNI)and the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score(mGPS)in colorectal cancer surgery. Gan to Kagaku Ryoho. Cancer and ChemoTherapy 41(10): 1273-1275, 2014

Validation of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC) - Analysis of patients enrolled in the GCIG Symptom Benefit Study (SBS). Gynecologic Oncology 148(1): 36-41, 2018

The high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score is superior to the modified Glasgow prognostic score as a prognostic predictor in patients with resectable gastric cancer. Oncology 87(4): 205-214, 2014

The modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) is a good predictor of indication for palliative bypass surgery in patients with unresectable pancreatic and biliary cancers. International Journal of Clinical Oncology 19(4): 629-633, 2014

The high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score is superior to the modified Glasgow prognostic score as a prognostic predictor for head and neck cancer. Oncotarget 9(97): 37008-37016, 2018

The preoperative sensitive-modified Glasgow prognostic score is superior to the modified Glasgow prognostic score in predicting long-term survival for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Oncotarget 7(41): 67485-67494, 2016

Esophageal stenosis and the Glasgow Prognostic Score as independent factors of poor prognosis for patients with locally advanced unresectable esophageal cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy (exploratory analysis of JCOG0303). International Journal of Clinical Oncology 22(6): 1042-1049, 2017

The modified glasgow prognostic score is an independent prognostic factor in patients with inoperable thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Journal of Cancer 5(8): 689-695, 2014

Prognostic impact of the high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score in patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer. Journal of Cancer Research and Therapeutics 12(2): 945-951, 2017

Modified Glasgow prognostic score is an independent prognostic factor in patients with cervical cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology 8(5): 5273-5281, 2015

Evaluation of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for stage III and IV esophageal cancer. Diseases of the Esophagus 29(8): 1071-1080, 2016

Usefulness of an inflammation-based prognostic score (mGPS) for predicting survival in patients with unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. World Journal of Surgery 37(9): 2222-2228, 2013