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Novel Fortified Blended Foods: Preference Testing with Infants and Young Children in Tanzania and Descriptive Sensory Analysis



Novel Fortified Blended Foods: Preference Testing with Infants and Young Children in Tanzania and Descriptive Sensory Analysis



Journal of Food Science 83(9): 2343-2350



The preference of porridge made from extruded fortified blended foods (FBFs) compared to a current nonextruded product (corn soy blend plus [CSB+]) among infants and young children was studied in Mwanza region, Tanzania. Five extruded, fortified blends were chosen as novel FBFs in this study: (i) corn soy blend 14 (CSB14), (ii) white sorghumFontanelle 4525 soy blend (SSB), (iii) white sorghumFontanelle 4525 cowpea blend (WSC1), (iv) white sorghum738Y cowpea blend (WSC2), and (v) red sorghum217X Burgundy cowpea blend (RSC). Paired preference testing between CSB+ and each novel FBF was conducted using approximately 600 children for each pair. Results showed that infants and young children prefer CSB14 and SSB over CSB+. Children did not show a preference between CSB+ and any of the 3 sorghum cowpea blends (WSC1, WSC2, and RSC) probably because of a distinct beany flavor from cowpea that they were not familiar with. This study indicated that novel FBFs have potential to be used successfully as supplementary food with higher or comparable preference compared to FBFs currently used in food aid programs. Successful novel fortified blended foods (FBFs) can be developed with appropriate nutrition and sensory appeal from indigenous and alternative food sources. Development of such foods requires an understanding not only of the nutritional composition, but also how ingredients impact sensory properties and how they can influence preferences. From this research, novel FBFs from sorghum and cowpea were shown to be equally or preferentially preferred and should be successful. Such information is important for creating new standards and alternative formulations for FBFs.

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Accession: 065361024

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 30079961

DOI: 10.1111/1750-3841.14287


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