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The Relationships among Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV), Non-Pharmacological Coping Methods, and Nutritional Status in Patients with Gynecologic Cancer



The Relationships among Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV), Non-Pharmacological Coping Methods, and Nutritional Status in Patients with Gynecologic Cancer



Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing 47(6): 731-743



Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) can cause severe malnutrition. However, relationships between CINV levels, non-pharmacological coping methods, and nutritional status of female cancer patients have rarely been investigated. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze their relationships in gynecologic cancer patients. Participants receiving a highly and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy were recruited. The level of CINV was assessed using a numeric rating scale. Coping methods were determined using multiple-choice self-report questionnaires and categorized into seven types for statistical analysis. Nutritional status was evaluated using biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Among all the 485 patients, 200 eligible inpatients were included. Despite the administration of prophylactic antiemetics, 157 patients (78.5%) still experienced CINV, and several used nonmedically recommended coping methods, such as just enduring the symptom or rejecting food intake. A total of 181 patients (90.5%) had nutritional disorders. Although the level of CINV was indirectly related to the occurrence of nutritional disorders, patients who rejected food (β=1.57, p=.023) and did not use physical measures (β= -1.23, p=.041) as coping methods were under the high risk of nutritional disorders. Korean gynecologic cancer patients had high levels of CINV and were at high risk of nutritional disorders, which may be related to the use of nonscientific coping methods, possibly due to cultural backgrounds and lack of proper nutritional program. Therefore, developing a culturally appropriate educational program for the cancer patients with CINV is urgently needed.

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Accession: 065608609

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PMID: 29326405

DOI: 10.4040/jkan.2017.47.6.731


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