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Larviciding Culex spp. (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations in Catch Basins and Its Impact on West Nile Virus Transmission in Urban Parks in Atlanta, GA



Larviciding Culex spp. (Diptera: Culicidae) Populations in Catch Basins and Its Impact on West Nile Virus Transmission in Urban Parks in Atlanta, GA



Journal of Medical Entomology 56(1): 222-232



In urban environments, road-side catch basins are common larval habitats of Culex spp. (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes and important targets of larval control in areas subject to West Nile virus (WNv) transmission. We quantified the impact of larviciding basins on Culex spp. populations and WNv infection prevalence by treating basins in and around urban parks in Atlanta, GA, using Mosquito Dunks and Bits (active ingredient, a.i., Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. isrealensis, Dunks-10.31%, Bits-2.86%) and Altosid 30-Day Briquets (a.i., S-methoprene 8.62%) in two separate seasons. Treatments were coupled with WNv surveillance using gravid traps and aspiration of adults resting in basins. Larviciding led to >90% reductions in Culex spp. larval and pupal collections (Dunks/Bits) and >90% pupal mortality (Briquets) in treated sites during treatment periods; however, we did not observe significant reductions in Culex spp. collections in gravid traps (general linear mixed-effects model [GLMM] result, P > 0.1) or in adults collected resting in basins (GLMM, P > 0.5). In addition, WNv infection prevalence in Culex spp. mosquitoes was similar between treated and untreated sites (GLMM, P > 0.05). Larval control remains important for controlling WNv in Atlanta; however, at the scale and frequency applied in our study, larval control alone may not lead to meaningful reductions in adult populations and WNv infection prevalence. A greater understanding of the annual dynamics of Culex spp. breeding and the importance of basins as Culex spp. larval habitats are needed to meaningfully affect WNv in cities such as Atlanta.

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Accession: 065830007

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 30295776

DOI: 10.1093/jme/tjy174


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