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Prognostic Value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score or Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score for Patients with Colorectal Cancer Receiving Various Treatments: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis



Prognostic Value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score or Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score for Patients with Colorectal Cancer Receiving Various Treatments: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis



Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry 51(3): 1237-1249



Increasing evidence indicates that the systemic inflammatory response plays a vital role in carcinogenesis. The Glasgow Prognostic Score or modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS/mGPS) is a novel inflammatory indicator which consists of CRP and albumin. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic value of the GPS/ mGPS in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and to assess its consistency in different CRC therapies. The electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched from inception through December 2017 for the association between the GPS/mGPS and clinical outcomes. Study characteristics and prognostic data were extracted from each relevant study. Overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were considered the primary outcomes, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. The quality of each study was pooled using the random-effects Mantel-Haenszel model. Finally, subgroup analyses were performed to detect the heterogeneity of different CRC treatments. Thirty-four studies, with a combined total of 8834 patients, were eligible for this meta-analysis. Data on OS and CSS were available in 23 and 22 studies, respectively. By comparing the prognostic values of different levels of the GPS in CRC patients, the summary HRs for OS and CSS were 2.18 (95% CI 1.83-2.60) and 1.82 (95% CI 1.57-2.11), respectively. According to the different tumor stages, the subgroup analyses were stratified by different treatments, including curative or palliative therapy. The results robustly confirmed the prognostic role of the GPS/mGPS. Our results suggest that the GPS/mGPS is a novel and effective prognostic indicator for the OS and CSS of patients with CRC.

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Accession: 065890719

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PMID: 30481755

DOI: 10.1159/000495500


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