+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Socioeconomic and demographic factors modify observed relationship between caregiving intensity and three dimensions of quality of life in informal adult children caregivers



Socioeconomic and demographic factors modify observed relationship between caregiving intensity and three dimensions of quality of life in informal adult children caregivers



Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 16(1): 169



The relationship between informal caregiving intensity and caregiver health is well-established, though research suggests this may vary by caregiver demographics. The aim of this exploratory study is to assess the association between caregiving intensity and three dimensions of quality of life outcomes, and determine how caregiver sociodemographics change the nature of this relationship among informal adult children caregivers. Using the 2011 National Study of Caregiving, associations between caregiving intensity and quality of life were examined in caregivers providing care to an aging parent (n = 1014). Logistic regression was used to model caregiver quality of life on caregiving intensity using an ordinal composite measure of caregiving activities, including Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), hours per month, and length of caregiving, stratified by race/ethnicity, gender, age, and family income. Odds ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Associations between caregiving intensity and quality of life varied substantially by race/ethnicity, gender, age, and annual family income. White caregivers were significantly more likely to experience negative emotional burden when providing high intensity care (ADL: 1.92, Hours: 3.23). Black caregivers were more likely to experience positive emotions of caregiving (ADL: 2.68, Hours: 2.60) as well as younger caregivers (Hours: 8.49). Older caregivers were more likely to experience social burden when providing high ADL, IADL, and monthly hours of care. These findings demonstrate the complex and multi-dimensional nature of caregiving, and emphasize the need to develop approaches that are tailored to the specific health needs of subpopulations of informal caregivers.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 065920294

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 30157852

DOI: 10.1186/s12955-018-0996-6


Related references

Socioeconomic and Demographic Disparities in Caregiving Intensity and Quality of Life in Informal Caregivers: A First Look at the National Study of Caregiving. Journal of Gerontological Nursing 43(6): 17-24, 2017

Socioeconomic and demographic factors modify the association between informal caregiving and health in the Sandwich Generation. Bmc Public Health 14: 362, 2014

Impact of informal caregiving on caregivers' health and quality of life: analysis of gender inequalities. Gaceta Sanitaria 22(5): 443-450, 2008

Dimensions of informal care and quality of life among elderly family caregivers. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 18(3): 239-248, 2004

Sociodemographic Disparities in Adult Child Informal Caregiving Intensity in the United States: Results from the New National Study of Caregiving. Journal of Gerontological Nursing 44(9): 15-20, 2018

Are informal caregivers less happy than noncaregivers? Happiness and the intensity of caregiving in combination with paid and voluntary work. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 27(1): 44-50, 2013

Burden of caregiving: evidence of objective burden, subjective burden, and quality of life impacts on informal caregivers of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis and Rheumatism 51(4): 570-577, 2004

Caregiving burden and the quality of life of family caregivers of cancer patients: the relationship and correlates. European Journal of Oncology Nursing 19(4): 376-382, 2015

Decisions and caregiving: end of life among blacks from the perspective of informal caregivers and decision makers. American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care 32(4): 454-463, 2015

Life satisfaction of two-year post-stroke survivors: effects of socio-economic factors, motor impairment, Newcastle stroke-specific quality of life measure and World Health Organization quality of life: bref of informal caregivers in Luxembourg and a rural area in Portugal. Cerebrovascular Diseases 33(3): 219-230, 2012

Factors influencing psychosocial adjustment and quality of life in Parkinson patients and informal caregivers. Quality of Life Research 25(8): 1959-1968, 2016

Correlation between depression and burden observed in informal caregivers of people suffering from dementia with time spent on caregiving and dementia severity. European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences 20(1): 59-63, 2016

Depressive symptoms among informal caregivers of older adults: insights from the Singapore Survey on Informal Caregiving. International Psychogeriatrics 24(8): 1335-1346, 2012

Caregiving to Older Adults: Determinants of Informal Caregivers' Subjective Well-being and Formal and Informal Support as Alleviating Conditions. Journals of Gerontology. Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 73(6): 1099-1111, 2018

Determinants of quality of life in Alzheimer's disease: perspective of patients, informal caregivers, and professional caregivers. International Psychogeriatrics 24(11): 1805-1815, 2012