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Mediating Effects of Depressive Symptoms on Perceived Social Support and HIV Disclosure: Assessing Moderation by Sex



Mediating Effects of Depressive Symptoms on Perceived Social Support and HIV Disclosure: Assessing Moderation by Sex



Aids and Behavior 23(3): 636-648



People living with HIV may decide to disclose their HIV-positive status after considering the benefits and costs. Studies have shown associations between perceived social support, depressive symptoms and HIV disclosure among men and women; however, research assessing the mediating pathway among these variables and the associated disparities by sex are lacking. Therefore, the aims of this study were to determine the association between perceived social support from family and friends and HIV disclosure to sexual partners; assess the mediating effects of depressive symptoms; and examine the disparities by sex. Participants included 147 men and 115 women living with HIV who took part in a disclosure intervention study. Mediation analyses were conducted to determine the direct and indirect associations between perceived social support from family and friends, depressive symptoms, and disclosure behavior. Depressive symptoms mediated the association between perceived social support (from family: β = 0.103, p = 0.019; and from friends: β = 0.111, p = 0.009) and HIV disclosure to sexual partners, specifically among women. However, these pathways were not statistically significant among men. Women living with HIV may benefit from two types of interventions: (1) Disclosure to sexual partners interventions, which aim to accentuate perceived social support from family and friends through attenuating depressive symptoms; and (2) Social support interventions, which may increase disclosure to sexual partners via reducing depressive symptoms.

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Accession: 065997921

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 30539497

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-018-2369-x


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