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Association of Long-term Exercise Training With Risk of Falls, Fractures, Hospitalizations, and Mortality in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis



Association of Long-term Exercise Training With Risk of Falls, Fractures, Hospitalizations, and Mortality in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis



JAMA Internal Medicine 2018



Long-term exercise benefits on prevalent adverse events in older populations, such as falls, fractures, or hospitalizations, are not yet established or known. To systematically review and investigate the association of long-term exercise interventions (≥1 year) with the risk of falls, injurious falls, multiple falls, fractures, hospitalization, and mortality in older adults. PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, SportDiscus, PsychInfo, and Ageline were searched through March 2018. Exercise randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with intervention length of 1 year or longer, performed among participants 60 years or older. Two raters independently screened articles, abstracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. Data were combined with risk ratios (RRs) using DerSimonian and Laird's random-effects model (Mantel-Haenszel method). Six binary outcomes for the risk of falls, injurious falls, multiple falls (≥2 falls), fractures, hospitalization, and mortality. Forty-six studies (22 709 participants) were included in the review and 40 (21 868 participants) in the meta-analyses (mean [SD] age, 73.1 [7.1] years; 15 054 [66.3%] of participants were women). The most used exercise was a multicomponent training (eg, aerobic plus strength plus balance); mean frequency was 3 times per week, about 50 minutes per session, at a moderate intensity. Comparator groups were often active controls. Exercise significantly decreased the risk of falls (n = 20 RCTs; 4420 participants; RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.98) and injurious falls (9 RTCs; 4481 participants; RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.62-0.88), and tended to reduce the risk of fractures (19 RTCs; 8410 participants; RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71-1.00; P = .05). Exercise did not significantly diminish the risk of multiple falls (13 RTCs; 3060 participants), hospitalization (12 RTCs; 5639 participants), and mortality (29 RTCs; 11 441 participants). Sensitivity analyses provided similar findings, except the fixed-effect meta-analysis for the risk of fracture, which showed a significant effect favoring exercisers (RR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.70-1.00; P = .047). Meta-regressions on mortality and falls suggest that 2 to 3 times per week would be the optimal exercise frequency. Long-term exercise is associated with a reduction in falls, injurious falls, and probably fractures in older adults, including people with cardiometabolic and neurological diseases.

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Accession: 066044667

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PMID: 30592475

DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5406


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