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Estimates of lactation curve parameters for Bonsmara and Nguni cattle using the weigh-suckle-weigh technique



Estimates of lactation curve parameters for Bonsmara and Nguni cattle using the weigh-suckle-weigh technique



South African Journal of Animal Science 43(5): S12-S16



Milk production accounts for about 60% of the variation in weaning weight and is therefore considered an economically important trait in beef production. However, milk production data is not routinely available in beef improvement programmes and therefore weaning weight is used as a proxy for milk production. Despite the importance of milk production in beef cattle, little research has been done to evaluate the milk production potential of South African indigenous beef cattle. The objective of this study was to estimate average lactation curve parameters for the South African Bonsmara and Nguni cattle. Milk yield was estimated using the weigh-suckle-weigh technique. Lactation curves were modelled using a nonlinear form of the incomplete gamma function (Wood function): Y-t = at(b)exp(-ct). Estimates of the a, b and c parameters were 4.095 +/- 0.808, 0.274 +/- 0.063 and 0.005 +/- 0.001 for the Bonsmara, respectively. Corresponding estimates for the Nguni were 1.869 +/- 1.527, 0.451 +/- 0.242 and 0.008 +/- 0.003. Peak lactation time was estimated to be 59 days in Bonsmara and 54 days in Nguni. Estimates of peak yields were 10 kg and 7 kg for the Bonsmara and Nguni, respectively. Estimates of daily milk yield obtained in the current study provide useful baseline information for more accurate modelling of South African beef production systems.

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Accession: 066281399

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DOI: 10.4314/sajas.v43i5.2


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