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Strategies for eliminating chicken manure odour in horticultural applications



Strategies for eliminating chicken manure odour in horticultural applications



Worlds Poultry Science Journal 73(2): 365-378



Application of chicken manure is commonly practiced in the horticultural industry due to its value as a fertiliser, ability to improve soil properties and relatively low cost. An unpleasant odour is inherently associated with poultry manure and is considered one of the major limitations in applying chicken manure to production land. Odours originating from chicken manure result from a combination of up to 150 compounds including volatile fatty acids, mercaptans, esters, carbonyls, aldehydes, alcohols, ammonia and amines. Odours are mainly generated by decomposition of chicken faeces, feathers, spilled feed, dust and bedding materials. Issues related to odour from chicken manure are associated with three main locations: sites of production and land application and storage areas. Many strategies have been tested for odour management at production sites, however, odour control, associated with storage and land application, are yet to be addressed. Since odour management is one of the major elements of overall environment management in crop production, this review provides an assessment of odour issues associated with use of chicken manure in the horticultural industry with special reference to minimising odour at storage and land application sites.

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Accession: 066334552

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DOI: 10.1017/S0043933917000083


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