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Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women: a cochrane systematic review abridged republication



Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, or inactive control treatments, for urinary incontinence in women: a cochrane systematic review abridged republication



Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy 2019



Pelvic floor muscle training is the most commonly used physical therapy treatment for women with urinary incontinence. To assess the effects of Pelvic floor muscle training for women with urinary incontinence in comparison to a control treatment and to summarize relevant economic findings. Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialized Register (February 12, 2018). Randomized or quasi-randomized trials in women with stress, urgency or mixed urinary incontinence (symptoms, signs, or urodynamic). Trials were independently assessed by at least two reviewers authors and subgrouped by urinary incontinence type. Quality of evidence was assessed by adopting the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. The review included thirty-one trials involving 1817 women from 14 countries. Overall, trials were small to moderate size, and many were at moderate risk of bias. There was considerable variation in the intervention's content and duration. Based on data available, we can be confident that Pelvic floor muscle training can cure or improve symptoms of stress and all other types of urinary incontinence. It may reduce the number of leakage episodes and the quantity of leakage, while improving reported symptoms and quality of life. Women were more satisfied with Pelvic floor muscle training, while those in control groups were more likely to seek further treatment. Long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Pelvic floor muscle training needs to be further researched. The addition of ten new trials did not change the essential findings of the earlier review, suggesting that Pelvic floor muscle training could be included in first-line conservative management of women with urinary incontinence.

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Accession: 066446963

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 30704907

DOI: 10.1016/j.bjpt.2019.01.002


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