+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Atherogenic dyslipidemia increases the risk of incident diabetes in statin-treated patients with impaired fasting glucose or obesity



Atherogenic dyslipidemia increases the risk of incident diabetes in statin-treated patients with impaired fasting glucose or obesity



Journal of Cardiology 74(3): 290-295



To investigate which metabolic factors increase the risk of incident diabetes (T2D) in statin-treated patients. A retrospective study conducted in Greece including 1241 consecutive individuals with dyslipidemia attending a lipid clinic for ≥3 years. After defining associations with incident T2D, we assessed the risk of new-onset T2D based on the presence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), atherogenic dyslipidemia, and overweight/obesity. After excluding 166 patients with baseline T2D and 193 subjects taking lipid-lowering therapy at the baseline visit, 882 participants were included in the study. Eleven percent (n=94) developed T2D during their follow-up (median 6 years; IQR: 4-10). Baseline patients' age (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.02-1.08, p<0.01), family history of diabetes (OR: 3.58; 95% CI: 1.86-6.91, p<0.01), IFG (OR: 6.56; 95% CI: 3.53-12.12, p<0.01), overweight/obesity (OR: 2.65; 95% CI: 1.39-5.05, p<0.01), atherogenic dyslipidemia (OR: 3.27; 95% CI: 1.50-7.15, p<0.01), and treatment with high-intensity statins (OR: 3.51; 95% CI: 1.89-6.51, p<0.01) were independently associated with increased risk of T2D in statin-treated patients. Among the IFG subjects, atherogenic dyslipidemia (OR: 3.44; 95% CI: 1.31-9.04, p=0.01) and overweight/obesity (OR: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.14-5.66, p<0.05) independently increased the risk of T2D. Among the overweight/obese ones, atherogenic dyslipidemia independently increased the risk of T2D (adjusted OR: 5.60; 95% CI: 2.19-14.30, p<0.01). Atherogenic dyslipidemia appears to be an independent risk factor for new-onset T2D in statin-treated patients, while IFG, overweight/obesity and family history of diabetes remain risk factors for new-onset T2D in this group.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 066624502

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 30910387

DOI: 10.1016/j.jjcc.2019.02.009


Related references

Atherogenic dyslipidemia and residual cardiovascular risk in statin-treated patients. Stroke 45(5): 1429-1436, 2014

Risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in individuals with diabetes mellitus, impaired fasting glucose, and impaired glucose tolerance: the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab). Circulation 116(2): 151-157, 2007

Metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose and obesity, as predictors of incident diabetes in 14 120 hypertensive patients of ASCOT-BPLA: comparison of their relative predictability using a novel approach. Diabetic Medicine 28(8): 941-947, 2011

Atherogenic dyslipidemia as evidenced by the lipid triad: prevalence and associated risk in statin-treated patients in ambulatory care. Current Medical Research and Opinion 26(12): 2833-2839, 2010

Atorvastatin treatment beneficially alters the lipoprotein profile and increases low-density lipoprotein particle diameter in patients with combined dyslipidemia and impaired fasting glucose/type 2 diabetes. Metabolism Clinical & Experimental 51(3): 334-342, 2002

Risk of Incident Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular DiseaseEvents by Achieved Atherogenic Lipid Levels Among62,428 Statin-Treated Individuals With Diabetes Mellitus. American Journal of Cardiology 122(5): 762-767, 2018

Impaired fasting glucose and the risk of incident diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular events. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 58(24): 2546-7; Author Reply 2547, 2011

Effects of impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance on predicting incident type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population with high post-prandial glucose. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 66(2): 183-191, 2004

Statin Use, Diabetes Incidence and Overall Mortality in Normoglycemic and Impaired Fasting Glucose Patients. Journal of General Internal Medicine 31(5): 502-508, 2016

Low fitness increases risk of impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 30(5 Suppl. ): S24, 1998

Impaired fasting glucose cutoff value of 5.6 mmol/l combined with other cardiovascular risk markers is a better predictor for incident Type 2 diabetes than the 6.1 mmol/l value: Tehran lipid and glucose study. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 85(1): 90-95, 2009

Impaired fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes in Turkish children Is obesity really a risk factor?. Pediatric Research 51(4 Part 2): 124A, 2002

Impaired fasting glucose and the risk of incident diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular events in an adult population: MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis). Journal of the American College of Cardiology 58(2): 140-146, 2011

Effects of impaired fasting and impaired glucose tolerance on the predicting incident Type 2 diabetes in a Chinese population. Diabetes & Metabolism 29(Hors serie 2): 4S58, 2003

Effects of changes in obesity and exercise on the development of diabetes and return to normal fasting plasma glucose levels at one-year follow-up in middle-aged subjects with impaired fasting glucose. Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine 6(2): 127-131, 2001