Alumina cream induced focal motor epilepsy in cats. II. Wakefulness--sleep modulation of pyramidal tract multiple unit activity

Velasco, M.; Velasco, F.; Cepeda, C.; Estrada-Villanueva, F.

Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 43(1): 67-73

1977


ISSN/ISBN: 0013-4694
PMID: 68874
DOI: 10.1016/0013-4694(77)90196-1
Accession: 068519248

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Abstract
Quantitative changes in tonic and phasic multiple unit activities of the pyramidal tract (PT MUA) were determined during wakefulness-sleep state shifts of a group of cats with alumina cream induced focal motor epilepsy. Tonic multiple unit activity from neck muscles (EMG MUA) was recorded as an indicator of peripheral neuromuscular tonic excitability. Changes in PT MUA and EMG MUA were related to other EEG and clinical epileptogenic events. During wakefulness (W), animals showed both EEG spikes and clinical convulsions. Tonic PT MUA and EMG MUA were high and phasic PT MUA showed a pronounced and significant transient increase time locked to the EEG spike. During slow wave sleep (SWS), animals showed EEG spikes with no (or discrete) clinical convulsions. Tonic PT MUA and EMG MUA were low and phasic PT MUA showed a slight although significant transient increase time locked to the EEG spike. During paradoxical sleep (PS) animals showed EEG spikes with no clinical convulsions. Tonic PT MUA was high while EMG MUA was low and phasic PT MUA showed a pronounced and significant transient increase time locked to the EEG spikes. A significant decrease in tonic and phasic PT MUA and tonic EMG MUA was found when animals shifted from W to SWS. A significant increase in tonic and phasic PT MUA and decrease in tonic EMG MUA were found when animals shifted from SWS to PS. No significant changes in tonic and phasic PT MUA and a significant decrease in EMG MUA were found when animals indirectly shifted from W to PS. Wakefulness-sleep states may modulate initiation and propagation of epileptic impulses at 2 different levels of the CNS: cortical and spinal. Accordingly, W activates both, SWS deactivates both and PS activates the cortical while deactivating the spinal one.