+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Inbred mice as model hosts for cutaneous leishmaniasis. I. Resistance and susceptibility to infection with Leishmania braziliensis, L. mexicana, and L. aethiopica



Inbred mice as model hosts for cutaneous leishmaniasis. I. Resistance and susceptibility to infection with Leishmania braziliensis, L. mexicana, and L. aethiopica



Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 78(1): 25-34



The susceptibility of 12 strains of inbred mice representing a broad genetic spectrum to infection of Leishmania braziliensis, L. mexicana and L. aethiopica was determined. Levels of susceptibility were evaluated by gross morphology of lesions, evidence of resolution, persistence of parasites at the site of inoculation, and visceralization to the spleen or liver following inoculation in noses. Very different patterns of responses were noted among the infections with the three species of Leishmania. Among the strains of inbred mice infected with L. braziliensis, patterns of cutaneous lesion development indicated a broad range of susceptibilities and responses. Two strains of inbred mice (AKR/J and CBA/J) showed only a slight and transient swelling of the nose. The SWR/J, C57L/J, A/J, A/HeJ and DBA/1J showed initial swellings or nodules which eventually resolved. In contrast, the BALB/cJ mice were ranked as most susceptible, based on progressive dermal lesions and visceralization. Four strains of inbred mice (C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, CBA/J and CBA/CaJ) showed no evidence of infection. Lesion development in most strains of inbred mice infected with L. mexicana occurred later than with L. braziliensis but was then more rapidly progressive with no indication of resolution. Two strains (C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6J) showed no evidence of infection. Only slight swellings of the nose were seen in the 12 strains of inbred mice infected with L. aethiopica; however, parasites were isolated by culture from apparently normal noses in five groups (A/HeJ, AKR/J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J and SWR/J).

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 068641965

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 6721612

DOI: 10.1080/00034983.1984.11811769


Related references

Inbred mice as model hosts for cutaneous leishmaniasis 1. resistance and susceptibility to infection with leishmania braziliensis leishmania mexicana and leishmania aethiopica. Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 78(1): 25-34, 1984

A comparative study of susceptibility of inbred and outbred mouse strains compared with hamsters to infection with new world cutaneous leishmaniases Leishmania mexicana mexicana, Leishmania braziliensis panamensis, Leishmania braziliensis braziliensis. Parasitology 87(1): 7-13, 1983

Draft Genome Sequences of Leishmania ( Leishmania ) amazonensis , Leishmania ( Leishmania ) mexicana , and Leishmania ( Leishmania ) aethiopica , Potential Etiological Agents of Diffuse Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Microbiology Resource Announcements 8(20):, 2019

Leishmaniasis in Brazil 15 Biochemical distinction of Leishmania mexicana amazonensis, L braziliensis braziliensis and L braziliensis guyanensis - aetiological agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis; in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 75.4: 524-529, 1981

Reservoir hosts of leishmania braziliensis braziliensis in a peculiar and coastal sited focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in ceara state brazil. Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz 82(Suppl. 1): 200, 1987

Leishmaniasis in Brazil. 12. Observations on cross-immunity in monkeys and man infected with Leishmania mexicana mexicana, L. m. amazonensis, L. braziliensis braziliensis, L. b. guyanensis and L. b. panamensis. 1977

Leishmaniasis in Brazil: XII. Observations on cross-immunity in monkeys and man infected with Leishmania mexicana mexicana, L. m. amazonensis, L. braziliensis braziliensis, L. b. guyanensis and L. b. panamensis. Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 80(2): 29-35, 1977

Testing of four Leishmania vaccine candidates in a mouse model of infection with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, the main causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the New World. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology 14(9): 1173-1181, 2007

Toward a novel experimental model of infection to study American cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis. Infection and Immunity 73(9): 5827-5834, 2005

Experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. I. Infection of albino mice and Syrian hamsters by Leishmania mexicana. Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo 7(3): 136-144, 1965

Inbred mice as model hosts for cutaneous leishmaniasis. Annals of Tropical Medicine & Parasitology 78(1): 25-34, 1984

The effects of protein malnutrition on the course of Leishmania mexicana infection in C57Bl/6 mice: nutrition and susceptibility to leishmaniasis. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 38(3): 453-460, 1979

Inbred mice as model hosts for cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Nigeria. Nigerian Veterinary Journal 1(1): 41-48, 1996

Experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. 3. Comparative pathology of infection by Leishmania brazilensis, Leishmania mexicana, and Leishmania tropica in laboratory animals. Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo 14(1): 12-29, 1972

Infection of BALB/c, C57B1/6 mice and F1 hybrid CB6F1 mice with strains of Leishmania mexicana isolated from Mexican patients with localized or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis. Archives of Medical Research 25(4): 401-406, 1994