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Genomic organization and expression of the 3' end of the canine and feline enteric coronaviruses



Genomic organization and expression of the 3' end of the canine and feline enteric coronaviruses



Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 342: 11-16



The genomic organization at the 3' end of canine coronavirus (CCV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) was determined by sequence analysis and compared to that of feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) of swine. Comparison of the latter two has previously revealed an extra open reading frame (ORF) at the 3' end of the FIPV genome, lacking in TGEV, now designated ORF 6b. Both CCV and FECV possess 6b-related ORFs. The CCV ORF 6b is colinear with that of FIPV, but the predicted amino acid sequences are only 58% identical. The FECV ORF 6b contains a large deletion compared to that of FIPV, reducing the colinear part to 60%. The sequence homologies were highest between CCV and TGEV on the one hand and between FECV and FIPV on the other. The expression product of the CCV and the FECV ORF 6b can be detected in infected cells by immunoprecipitation.

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Accession: 068676475

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PMID: 8209715


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