+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Feline coronavirus with and without spike gene mutations detected by real-time RT-PCRs in cats with feline infectious peritonitis



Feline coronavirus with and without spike gene mutations detected by real-time RT-PCRs in cats with feline infectious peritonitis



Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 2019: 1098612x19886671



Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) emerges when feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) mutate within their host to a highly virulent biotype and the immune response is not able to control the infection. FCoV spike (S) gene mutations are considered to contribute to the change in virulence by enabling FCoV infection of and replication in macrophages. This study investigated the presence of FCoV with and without S gene mutations in cats with FIP using two different real-time RT-PCRs on different samples obtained under clinical conditions. Fine-needle aspirates (FNAs) and incisional biopsies (IBs) of popliteal and mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, omentum and kidneys (each n = 20), EDTA blood (n = 13), buffy coat smears (n = 13), serum (n = 11), effusion (n = 14), cerebrospinal fluid (n = 16), aqueous humour (n = 20) and peritoneal lavage (n = 6) were obtained from 20 cats with FIP diagnosed by immunohistochemistry. Samples were examined by RT-PCR targeting the FCoV 7b gene, detecting all FCoV, and S gene mutation RT-PCR targeting mutations in nucleotides 23531 and 23537. The prevalence of FCoV detected in each sample type was calculated. In 20/20 cats, FCoV with S gene mutations was present in at least one sample, but there was variation in which sample was positive. FCoV with mutations in the S gene were most frequently found in effusion (64%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 39-89), followed by spleen, omentum and kidney IBs (50%, 95% CI 28-72), mesenteric lymph node IBs and FNAs (45%, 95% CI 23-67), and FNAs of spleen and liver and liver IBs (40%, 95% CI 19-62). In these 20 cats with FIP, FCoVs with S gene mutations were found in every cat in at least one tissue or fluid sample. This highlights the association between mutated S gene and systemic FCoV spread. Examining a combination of different samples increased the probability of finding FCoV with the mutated S gene.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 069520244

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 31729897


Related references

Sensitivity and specificity of a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction detecting feline coronavirus mutations in effusion and serum/plasma of cats to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis. Bmc Veterinary Research 13(1): 228, 2017

Limitations of using feline coronavirus spike protein gene mutations to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis. Veterinary Research 48(1): 60, 2017

Detection of feline coronavirus spike gene mutations as a tool to diagnose feline infectious peritonitis. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 19(4): 321-335, 2017

Acquisition of macrophage tropism during the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis is determined by mutations in the feline coronavirus spike protein. Journal of Virology 79(22): 14122-14130, 2005

Detection of feline coronavirus mutations in paraffin-embedded tissues in cats with feline infectious peritonitis and controls. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 21(2): 133-142, 2019

Feline infectious peritonitis: role of the feline coronavirus 3c gene in intestinal tropism and pathogenicity based upon isolates from resident and adopted shelter cats. Virus Research 165(1): 17-28, 2012

Differential recognition of peptides within feline coronavirus polyprotein 1 ab by sera from healthy cats and cats with feline infectious peritonitis. Virology 532: 88-96, 2019

Detection of feline coronavirus antibody, feline immunodeficiency virus antibody, and feline leukemia virus antigen in ascites from cats with effusive feline infectious peritonitis. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 66(1): 89-90, 2004

Antibody-dependent enhancement of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection in feline alveolar macrophages and human monocyte cell line U937 by serum of cats experimentally or naturally infected with feline coronavirus. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 60(1): 49-55, 1998

Amino acid changes in the spike protein of feline coronavirus correlate with systemic spread of virus from the intestine and not with feline infectious peritonitis. Veterinary Research 45: 49, 2014

Risk of feline infectious peritonitis in cats naturally infected with feline coronavirus. American Journal of Veterinary Research 56(4): 429-434, 1995

Feline coronavirus in the intestinal contents of cats with feline infectious peritonitis. Veterinary Record 139(21): 522-523, 1996

Detection of ascitic feline coronavirus RNA from cats with clinically suspected feline infectious peritonitis. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 75(10): 1389-1392, 2013

Detection of Ascitic Feline Coronavirus Rna from Cats with Clinically Suspected Feline Infectious Peritonitis. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 75(10): 1389-1392, 2013

Prevalence of feline coronavirus types I and II in cats with histopathologically verified feline infectious peritonitis. Veterinary Microbiology 99(1): 31-42, 2004